Archive for water

Reasons Why Food Sucks

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 17, 2013 by ecofrenfood

December 10, 2012

Reasons Why Food Sucks

1. You eat, then a few hours later you’re hungry again.
2. It messes up your face.
3. It gets stuck in your teeth at the worst possible time.
4. It makes your breath stink.
5. It makes you fart.
6. It makes you poo.
7. It can get you really sick and make you barf.
8. It makes you thirsty, then you have to drink water, and that opens a whole other can of worms.  (Please see “Reasons Why Water Sucks” volumes 1,2, and 3).
9. It makes you fat.
10. It makes you feel like a lazy lion.
11. It gets your teeth all dirty.
12. You HAVE to eat, so you’re a slave to food for your entire life.  Food is your master!  Ahhhhhh!
13. It makes you have to wash your hands and use napkins.
14. It can taste really bad.
15. It can smell up the whole place.
16. When other people are eating food, then you might get hungry too.
17. Did I mention it makes you POO?
18. You get grumpy and start making all these dorky noises when you don’t have food.
19. It can burn and start fires.
20. It makes you indecisive cuz there are so many different types of food.  Then you waste all this time trying to decide while your stomach growls away.  Then you don’t get to eat cuz you spent so much time deciding what you want to eat that you’re now late for your chiropractor appointment.  Then your chriopractor gets pissed and cracks your back in half.

That’s why I say: SCREW FOOD!

http://www.mondaiji.com/blog/other/general/10157-reasons-why-food-sucks

Drinking Water, Sanitation & Hygiene

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 1, 2013 by ecofrenfood
Drinking Water, Sanitation & Hygiene

The UN suggests that each person needs 20-50 litres of water a day to ensure their basic needs for drinking, cooking and cleaning.
Source: World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP)

In 2010, 89 % of the world’s population, or 6.1 billion people, used improved drinking water sources, exceeding the MDG target (88 %); 92 % are expected to have access in 2015. By 2015, 67 % will have access to improved sanitation facilities (the MDG target is 75 %).
Source: WHO

Between 1990 and 2010, two billion people gained access to improved drinking water sources and 1.8 billion people gained access to improved sanitation facilities.
Source: WHO

11% of the global population, or 783 million people, are still without access improved sources of drinking water.
Source: JMP 2012

Globally, diarrhoea is the leading cause of illness and death, and 88 per cent of diarrhoeal deaths are due to a lack of access to sanitation facilities, together with inadequate availability of water for hygiene and unsafe drinking water.
Source: JMP

The provision of improved sanitation and safe drinking water could reduce diarrhoeal diseases by nearly 90 per cent.
Source: JMP

Today 2.5 billion people, including almost one billion children, live without even basic sanitation. Every 20 seconds, a child dies as a result of poor sanitation. That’s 1.5 million preventable deaths each year.
Source: WWDR, 2012


In Sub-Saharan Africa, treating diarrhoea consumes 12 percent of the health budget. On a typical day, more than half the hospital beds in are occupied by patients suffering from faecal-related disease.
Source: WSSCC

Washing hands with soap can reduce the risk of diarrhoeal diseases by up to 47 per cent.
Source: WHO

The first ever global handwashing day was celebrated on 15 October during the International Year of Sanitation.
While the percent of population with access to improved facilities increased since 1990 in all regions, the number of people living without access has increased due to slow progress and population growth. In 2008, 2.6 billion people had still no access to improved sanitation facilities.
The Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target is to reduce by half the proportion of people without access to basic sanitation by 2015.
Source: World Bank

Resourcing of the water, sanitation and hygiene sector is relatively low priority compared to other sectors. In many countries, policies and programmes underemphasise adequate financing and human resource development to sustain the existing infrastructure and to expand access to sanitation, drinking-water and hygiene services.
Source: UN-Water: GLAAS, 2012

Overall, the number of cholera cases for the decade 2000–2010 increased by 130 %.
Source: WHO, 2010

With increasing populations living in peri-urban slums and refugee camps, as well as increasing numbers of people exposed to the impacts of humanitarian crises, the risk from cholera will likely increase worldwide.
Source: WWDR, 2012

63 % of the global population use toilets and other improved sanitation facilities.
2.5 billion people lack improved sanitation.
1.1 billion people (15 % of the global population) practice open defecation.
949 million open defecators live in rural areas.
Source: WHO 2012

Wisdom on Drinking

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 5, 2013 by ecofrenfood

Wisdom on Drinking

Drunk Taster 
 
In an alcohol factory the regular taster died and the director was in urgent need of looking for a replacement.
 
A drunkard with ragged, dirty look came to apply for the position.

The director of the factory wondered how to send him away. They tested him.

They gave him a glass with a drink.
 
He tried it and said, “It’s red wine, a Muscat, three years old, grown on a north slope, matured in steel containers.”
 
“That’s correct”, said the boss.

Another glass.
 
“It is red wine, cabernet, eight years old, a south-western slope, oak barrels.”
 
“Correct.”

A third glass. 
 
”It’s champagne, high grade and exclusive” calmly said the drunk.

The director was astonished. 
 
He winked at his secretary to suggest something.

She brought in a glass of urine. The alcoholic tried it.

“It’s a blonde, 26 years old, pregnant in the third month. 
And if you don’t give me the job, I’ll name the father!” 
 
    

 
 
THIS WISDOM IS VALUABLE!

 
To my friends who enjoy a glass of wine...
And those who don’t.

As Ben Franklin said:
In wine there is wisdom,
In beer there is freedom,
In water there are bacteria.

In a number of carefully controlled trials,
Scientists have demonstrated that if we drink
1 litre of water each day,
At the end of the year we would have absorbed
More than 1 kilo of Escherichia coli, (E. Coli) – bacteria
Found in faeces.
In other words, we are consuming 1 kilo of poop.

However, we do NOT run that risk when drinking
wine & beer or tequila, rum, whiskey or other liquor
Because alcohol has to go through a purification

process of boiling, filtering and/or fermenting.

Remember:
Water = Poop,
Wine = Health
.
Therefore, it’s better to drink wine and talk stupid,

Than to drink water and be full of shit
.

There is no need to thank me for this valuable information:
I’m doing it as a public service!

How to Determine if an Egg is Fresh?

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2012 by ecofrenfood

How to Determine if an Egg is Fresh?

Fill a container up with warm water. I use warm water. The reason for this is. Eggs are porous. If you put an egg in cold water, it will contract and draw any bacteria that is on the outside of the shell in through the pores. This is not good. So, if you use warm water, the egg will expand, and you will notice that little air bubbles form on the shell.

Put your eggs into the warm water, and look at them. A very fresh egg will sink to the bottom and lay on it’s side. Week old eggs will rest on the bottom but the fat end of the egg will rise up slightly. Three week old eggs will be balanced on pointy end with the fat end sticking up. Old eggs will be floating, bobbing along the surface of the water. These floaters should be tossed as they aren’t any good to eat.

10 Ways We Waste Water

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 11, 2012 by ecofrenfood

10 Ways We Waste Water
May 25, 2010 | By Casey Holley

Water shortages in some areas of the country are common, even in areas where fresh water seems abundant. Conserving water is important because, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA, only 2.8 percent of the water on the Earth’s surface is suitable for consumption.

Leaving Water Running
When you brush your teeth, take a shower, wash your face or wash dishes, you will waste a lot of water if you leave the water running. Turn the water off when you don’t need water, such as when you lather up in the shower. You can always turn the water back on when you need to rinse.

Partial Loads
Running the dishwasher or washer with only a partial load, especially if the load size isn’t adjustable on the appliance, can waste a lot of water. To conserve water, wait until you have a full load or purchase a new appliance with adjustable load sizes.

Leaks
The Southwest Florida Water Management District states that even a slow water leak can waste up to 300 gallons of water per month. Check for leaks by reading your water meter and then returning 30 minutes later to recheck the reading. During that time, no water should be used. If the meter reading changes, you have a leak.
Automatic Pool Refilling
Automatic pool refilling devices constantly refill the water level in your pool. These devices can make it difficult to realize that your pool or pump is leaking. Instead of these devices, install a recirculation pump and keep an eye on the water level so you know if your pool is leaking.
Baths or Long Showers
Taking a full bath or a long shower uses a lot of water, up to 50 gallons notes the EPA. Instead, take a 5-minute shower or only fill the bathtub up a third of the way. In addition to saving water, you will save money on heating the water.
Inefficient Appliances and Fixtures
High flow toilets, shower heads, faucets and other appliances waste a considerable amount of water. The California Energy Commission states that 75 percent of water used in a home is in the bathroom. Changing these items only in the bathroom can save a lot of water, but changing them throughout the house is even better.
Constant Flow Recreational Toys
Toys that require a constant flow of water waste a lot of water. If your child has a toy like this, use it in an area of the yard that needs to be watered and limit the amount of time the toy is used.

Vehicle Washes
Car washes and washing your vehicle with a hose can waste water. Some car washes now have recycling pumps so any water used is recycled for another wash but try to avoid car washes that don’t recycle the water. If you wash your vehicle with a hose, wet the vehicle and then turn the water off while you scrub it. Turn the water back on to rinse.

Linen Changes
Hotels, motels and other similar facilities waste a lot of water on daily linen changes. When you are at home, you probably don’t wash your sheets daily, so don’t have them washed daily at the hotel unless you are going to bed filthy at night

Driveway Cleaning
Rinsing off your driveway instead of sweeping it off or using a blower to blow the debris off is a waste of water. Use a deck brush or broom with water only on heavily soiled areas of the driveway and then allow the area to dry. Once it is dry, sweep up dirt or debris.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/130826-waste-water/#ixzz268XZ2LhK

Dangers of Energy Drinks

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 7, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Dangers of Energy Drinks
High Caffeine Drinks Not Meant for Exercise
By Wendy Bumgardner, About.com Guide
Updated September 30, 2011

High-caffeine energy drinks have become increasingly popular, but these drinks don’t mix well with exercise. While most sports drinks are non-caffeinated and meant to replenish fluids lost in exercise, energy drinks have a large dose of caffeine and caffeine-like stimulants (such as guarana). These can lead to dehydration, according to Dee Rollins, R.D., Ph.D., dietitian with Baylor Regional Medical Center at Grapevine, Texas.

Sports Drinks vs. Energy Drinks
Traditional sports drinks such as Gatorade and Powerade include water, salt, and sugars in proportions that help the body absorb fluids and salts lost in sweat and in the breath while exercising. The sugars not only help the body take in the water, but also provide fuel for muscles that need sugars to keep performing well during long walks, runs, or bikes. A small amount of salt helps protect the body from hyponatremia, (also known as water intoxication), which can happen if you drink a large amount of water without any salt.
Energy drinks are formulated to deliver caffeine and other stimulants, such as guarana or ginseng, to give the drinker a rush of energy. They are not designed to replace lost fluids during exercise. Some come in small cans that deliver a large amount of caffeine in a small amount of fluid. Many are carbonated, which can lead exercisers to experience burping, nausea and a bloated feeling.

Marketing at Athletic Events
The energy drink Red Bull is often handed out at running and walking events by marketers, which might lead people to think it is a sports drink. “Most people assume that if you stick something in their hand while they are exercising, that it is good for them,” says Rollins. But Red Bull comes in small cans that pack as much caffeine as a cup of coffee (80 milligrams) and more than a can of cola (40 milligrams). While replacing less fluid, it delivers a punch of caffeine that stimulates the kidneys to produce more urine and lose more fluid.

Dangers of Too Much Caffeine and Exercise
Rollins notes that if you have already had a cup or two of coffee in the morning, adding a can of energy drink can put you over the amount of caffeine most dietitians think is a reasonable limit for the day. “You are losing body fluids through perspiration when walking. Caffeine compounds dehydration further,” said Rollins.
Losing Track of Caffeine
If exercisers rely on energy drinks, they may drink two to three small cans thinking they haven’t had enough fluids. If they drink a larger can, it may contain two servings. Many pain medications, sinus medications, and other beverages also contain caffeine. “People may be in more trouble than they realize,” said Rollins. She says a general consensus is that 250 milligrams per day of caffeine should be the limit. Drinking more than 400 milligrams a day — two cups of coffee and an energy drink — can lead to jitteriness, nausea, or even heart palpitations.

Effects of Caffeine When Exercising
Caffeine stimulates urine production, which removes water from the body. If you are already losing water in sweat, losing more in the urine means needing to drink more during exercise. Caffeine can also have a laxative effect. “When you walk, you make your whole GI tract move from mouth to rectum,” noted Rollins. This can lead to needing a restroom more often, or with more urgency (runners trots).
Preventing Dehydration
There is no magic formula for determining how much water and sports drink you need to prevent dehydration while exercising. Everyone reacts a little differently. The recommended rule of thumb for walkers and runners is to carry water or sports drink with you so you can drink as soon as you are thirsty. Don’t ignore hunger pangs, either. Rollins notes that some people will feel hungry rather than thirsty when they need water.
Weighing yourself before and after a workout can tell you whether you are drinking correctly. You should neither gain nor lose any weight over the course of a workout. If you lose weight, you are dehydrated. If you gained weight, you are drinking too much and may put yourself at risk of hyponatremia.

Drinking Recommendations for Distance Walkers
The International Marathon Medical Director’s Association revised guidelines for drinking and fluid intake for walkers and runners at endurance events in May 2006. For a workout of 30 minutes or more, they recommend drinking sports drink, and not diluting the sports drink with extra water or switching back and forth between sports drink and water. Evidence says that thirst is the best protection for athletes when it comes to drinking the correct amount.
•Drink when you are thirsty.
•Don’t drink if you aren’t thirsty.
•Don’t drink at every water stop at an event just because it is there or your companions are drinking.
•Rely on your thirst unless you discover it is leading you wrong, from weighing yourself before and after a workout.
Sources:

Lewis G. Maharam, MD.FACSM (chair),Tamara Hew DPM, Arthur Siegel MD, Marv Adner, MD, Bruce Adams, MD and Pedro Pujol, MD, FACSM. “IMMDA’s Revised Fluid Recommendations for Runners and Walkers.” IMMDA. 6 May 2006.

Tamara Hew-Butler, DPM, Joseph G. Verbalis, MD, and Timothy D. Noakes, MBChB, MD, DSc, “Updated Fluid Recommendation: Position Statement From the International Marathon Medical Directors Association (IMMDA),” Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, 2006;16:283

CNN news

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 7, 2012 by ecofrenfood

From Int’l New, CNN: NASA reports, that by the next 10 months, earth
gets hotter by 4 degrees from now. Himalayan
glaciers are melting
at rapid rate. Our climate is changing drastically & it’s getting
worst. So we must help fight Global warming by the
doing the following:
1. Plant more trees
2. Don’t waste water, water is precious
3. Use cloth bag instead of plastic
4. Don’t burn plastic
and please don’t delete without forwarding even to just one (1)
person. Do your share and part. SAVE OUR PLANET! Pass
this and save our mother earth.