Archive for liver

Newly reformulated 10-calorie sodas leave fructose levels a mystery

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 24, 2013 by ecofrenfood

 

Newly reformulated 10-calorie sodas leave fructose levels a mystery

Posted by — May 16, 2013

Are you an ‘ex-Pepper’? If so, The Dr. Pepper/Snapple Group hopes to bring you back into the fold.  In an effort to lure what it refers to as “consumers who have left the soft drink category” the company is working feverishly to blanket the country with a new lineup of products, consisting of some of its biggest brand names reformulated with a witches’ brew of synthetic sweeteners – a combination of high fructose corn syrup, aspartame and acesulfame potassium (what the company calls its “proprietary blend”).  The selling point is that each supposedly contains no more than 10 calories per 12-ounce serving, which accounts for the special designation under which they’re being marketed  –“TEN.”

Since HFCS is the second ingredient in the three “TENs” I looked at, Canada Dry Ginger Ale, 7Up and Dr. Pepper, I couldn’t help wondering what the fructose amount is in the HFCS being used. After all, Archer Daniels Midland, one of the biggest manufacturers of this test-tube sweetener, has run ads for a product called “Cornsweet 90” a HFCS blend containing 90 percent fructose that it has called “the ideal choice for reduced calorie foods such as beverages…” And the Corn Refiners Association (CRA) itself has acknowledged in a letter to the Food and Drug Administration that this mega-fructose additive has been in use “with FDA knowledge for decades” (more on that in a minute). So I called the Dr. Pepper Snapple company press office with my question.

In the short conversation I had with company spokesperson Chris Barnes, I leaned more ‘ad speak’ than I could have in a Mad Men marathon. Terms like the “broader TEN platform,” “mouth feel,” “broader flavor system,” and my favorite, the “lapsed soft drink consumer” were dropped repeatedly in our talk. But when I got to my fructose question, Chris didn’t have an answer for me other than “I don’t know that we do share specific ingredient information beyond what’s on the label.” He did ask why I was interested and promised to follow up with the research and development department, but felt fairly sure the company wouldn’t divulge that information.

Although I didn’t get any further insight about fructose amounts from Barnes, he did tell me how “very excited” the company is so far with how “TEN” is “performing,” allowing folks who had concerns over taste and calories to now have the “benefit” of a soft drink once again.

A shocking acknowledgment

Now admittedly, the question of fructose amounts in HFCS is a touchy subject, something the CRA likes to gloss over by repeatedly asserting that the additive isn’t really high in fructose (one reason it had unsuccessfully sought to change its name to “corn sugar”) and telling consumers over and over that HFCS is “virtually the same” as real sugar, which is a 50/50 combination of glucose and fructose.

But contrary to the big public relations blitz put out by the CRA claiming that “sugar is sugar,” a growing body of evidence has come to light showing  that HFCS is apparently being used by food and beverage manufacturers in highly fluctuating fructose amounts, including the mega-90 version. Such findings led Citizens for Health to file a petition with the Food and Drug Administration last September, which asked the agency to take action against manufacturers using HFCS with fructose levels above 55 percent, the highest amount the FDA allows, and in the interim, to require the actual amount of fructose it contains to be specified on product labels. (To sign and support that petition, click here).

The CRA response to the FDA about that petition was a shocking acknowledgment that, in violation of FDA regulations, HFCS-90 has been used in the food supply “with FDA knowledge for decades.”  The letter, signed by CRA interim president J. Patrick Mohan, also refers to “fluctuations in fructose levels above 42 or 55%” in HFCS, that he apparently believes “would be expressly permitted” by the agency.

But despite Mohan’s apparent belief that all is fine and dandy regardless of what the actual fructose amount in an HFCS blend might be, the FDA has made it perfectly clear that HFCS 90 “contains a substantially different ratio of glucose to fructose than…HFCS-55,” and that the agency doesn’t have enough information to “ensure that this product is safe.”

Numerous medical experts and extensive studies have linked excess fructose consumption to a wide variety of health problems, such as obesity, diabetes, liver and heart disease. And for the CRA, which spent many millions of dollars to tell consumers that HFCS really isn’t high in fructose at all, this statement is quite telling.

But for now, the matter of just how much fructose might be in those new Dr. Pepper/Snapple Group formulas remains a mystery. Which is something you might want to keep in mind before you reach for a “TEN” on your supermarket shelf in the belief that you can now have the “benefit” of drinking soda without having to worry about the consequences.

 

http://foodidentitytheft.com/newly-reformulated-10-calorie-sodas-leave-fructose-levels-a-mystery/

Foods that can eliminate bad breath

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 19, 2013 by ecofrenfood

Foods that can eliminate bad breath

Tuesday, January 15th 2013.

Eliminate bad breath

 

Foods that can eliminate bad breath | dmatxi.com. Although often overlooked, mouth and teeth uncared can lead to a bad breath or halitosis. Collection of bad bacteria in the mouth that interact with the remnants of food will produce odors. If you want practical, brush your teeth after breakfast and before bed. Use a toothpaste that has been packed full with natural extracts, such as lime, betel leaves, and salt, which would protect oral health. Plus, create a longer lasting fresh breath.

 

People who have problems of bad breath (halitosis) is generally not aware of any problems. Actually there is an easy way to test the breath smell. Press a clean finger into the mouth and then wipe the saliva in the back of the tongue. Allow a few moments and then smell your finger.

 

eliminate bad breath, causes bad breath, reduce bad breath

 

Causes of bad breath

 

  • Bacteria; The mouth is one part of the body that liked by bacteria. These microorganisms lurking in between the teeth and tongue surface. When the bacteria multiply and accumulate toxins and they will issue a less pleasant odor.
  • Tonsils; Holes on the inside of the tonsils (tonsillectomy) is called crypts, is one culprit of halitosis. The dots on lymphoid tissue in the swollen tonsils often tucked away leftovers and bacteria that cause bad odors.
  • Foods; Foods such as garlic, durian, or fish, also cause bad breath, even though we have to brush your teeth.
  • Disease; Bad breath can also be a sign of diseases such as respiratory infections, chronic sinus infections, diabetes, kidney disorders, liver, and chronic acid reflux.
  • Dry mouth; Lack of drinking water and a dry mouth is also a contributor to the cause of bad breath problem. That’s why, when wake up in the morning bad breath. This smell usually goes away after you brush your teeth and drink water.

 

Foods reduce and eliminate of bad breath

 

  • Lemon; Try to suck the lemon slices, or biting edge of the lemon. If you are in restaurants, can order water with lemon in it, or lemon tea. For the times of urgency, with candy lemon-flavored can also help, plus more portable.
  • Apples, pears, and carrots; These foods are rich in fiber, plus chewing these foods will help mouth produce saliva. Both of these will create a kind of cleansing the mouth.
  • Crispy seasoning; For more exotic solutions, try searching for cardamom, coriander, or fennel seeds, commonly sold in places where the sale of spices. Chewing spices were going to remove the oil to neutralize bad breath.
  • Leaves of mint or cinnamon sticks; These materials can help neutralize the unpleasant odor of onions and garlic. Plus, oil of cinnamon can kill bacteria in the mouth so as not to grow more. Cinnamon or mint gum as effective. If you are lovers of chewing gum, choose a sense of mint chewing gum containing xylitol to reduce the risk of cavities and refreshes the breath.
  • Berry fruit and yogurt; If you can not get through the day without eating foods that can trigger bad breath smell, eat for prevention, which is better than trying to eliminate the smell that was overpowering. Eating half a cup of plain yogurt, sugar free, low in fat and can reduce levels of hydrogen sulfide odors that cause bad breath. Berries, as well as melons, oranges and other fruits that contain vitamin C, also can reduce oral bacteria that smell. Start each day with a fruit yogurt provided as a complement.

Bad breath can be triggered by various factors, one is from foods. Food can not only cause bad breath, but also can help eliminate the odor. Bad breath or halitosis, is caused by various reasons such as eating certain foods, smoking, gum disease, dry mouth and oral bacteria.

http://dmatxi.com/15/foods-that-can-eliminate-bad-breath.html

Bracing for the Foie Gras Ban

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 28, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Bracing for the Foie Gras Ban
by Clarissa Cruz

With a ban on producing or serving fois gras lurking on the horizon, how are California’s top chefs reacting to dropping the delicacy from their menus?
http://www.inc.com/one-chef%E2%80%99s-take-on-the-foie-gras-ban.html

When I think back on some of the most memorable dishes I’ve ever had, there seems to be bit of a recurring theme: The perfectly grilled steak topped with crumbles of foie gras from a little stall in Barcelona’s Boqueria market. A luscious, fat slab of foie gras terrine served with charred bread and thick jam at Derriere in Paris. And just last week, a single plump langoustine, seared and garnished with yes, a tiny slice of foie gras at Le Bernardin in New York City.

If I lived in California, I’d have to forgo these experiences—locally anyway. Because starting in July 2012 a long-anticipated ban on the production and sale of foie gras will go into effect there. Luckily—and for many other reasons that have nothing to do with duck livers—I live in New York instead. It’s hard for me to imagine the likes of New York City chefs David Chang and Jean Georges Vongerichten going the way of Los Angeles’s Wolfgang Puck and dropping foie gras from their menus without a fight.

But it got me wondering what other chefs in California think about not being able to use the luxe, controversial delicacy in the near future. (If you need a primer on what all the ruffled feathers are about, foie gras is traditionally made from the fattened livers of farm-raised, force-fed ducks; there is debate about whether the practice is a form of animal cruelty.)

“I’m not an advocate for the mistreatment of animals, but people enjoy eating foie gras, and it’s something that has been part of finer cuisine for ages. I hate to lose something that has so much tradition,” says Jason Maitland, executive chef of San Diego’s popular Flavor Del Mar. The restaurant serves dishes featuring the ingredient—but doesn’t have the words “foie gras” printed on the menus, to avoid protests by animal rights activists. Instead Maitland keeps it on hand to prepare as specials or when regular customers request dishes containing it.

He says he began the practice when he was chef at Arterra Restaurant in the Marriott Del Mar and the chain wanted to avoid negative publicity. “They said ‘Take it off your written menu, but you’re welcome to serve it,'” says Maitland.

So he continues the policy at his current post, but will comply with the ban once it goes into effect. “I met with the Animal Rescue and Protection League, who wanted us to stop serving foie gras,” he says. “I told them the product will be illegal soon enough. It’s not like they’re going to stop production and these birds I’m getting right now will be released and fly south for the winter. They’re already being farmed and harvested so this either goes to waste or I use it. And while I have the chance, we’re going to serve it.”

As for diners, time will tell how much the ban will affect their restaurant habits. “I do love foie gras and have seen compelling arguments on both sides as to the humane nature of its farming—at best it’s a relatively painless procedure and at worst, it’s a lot better than some other widely adopted farming techniques,” says Linden Goh, who is based in Los Angeles and writes the food blog Gastronomnom http://www.gastronomnom.com. “Will I miss it? Sure, from time to time and I’ll still happily eat it when I travel.”

What do you think? How do you think the ban will affect California chefs and diners?

Clarissa Cruz is the Fashion Features Editor of O, The Oprah Magazine. She is the former Style Editor of People magazine and has written for Entertainment Weekly, InStyle, Food & Wine, and Budget Travel. She has also appeared as an entertainment expert on television, including the Today show, the CBS Early Show, Access Hollywood, MTV, VH1 and E!. She lives in New York City.

Top 10 Foods Highest in Selenium

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 28, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Top 10 Foods Highest in Selenium

#1: Nuts (Brazil Nuts)
Nuts, especially Brazil nuts, are a great source of selenium. Brazil nuts, which are also rich in magnesium, provide the most selenium with 1917μg (2739% DV) per 100 gram serving, 2550μg (3642% DV) per cup, and 96μg (137% DV) in a single kernel or nut. Mixed nuts by contrast provide about half as much selenium with 422μg (77% DV) per 100 gram serving, 607μg (111% DV) per cup, and 118μg (169% DV) per ounce.

#2: Shellfish (Oysters, Mussels, Whelk)
In addition to selenium oysters and shellfish are also a great source of iron, zinc, copper, and vitamin B12. Pacific oysters provide the most selenium with 154μg (220% DV) per 100 gram serving, or 131μg (52% DV) per ounce, and 38.5μg (55% DV) per oyster. Other shellfish high in selenium include blue mussels and whelk which provide 90μg (128% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, 76μg (109% DV) per 3 ounce serving.

#3: Liver
The liver of most any animal is packed with nutrients like selenium. Often appearing on the culinary scene as pâté, liver can also be eaten in sausage (liverwurst), and prepared steamed or fried with onions and herbs. Lamb liver provides the most selenium with 116μg per 100g serving or 166% of the DV. That is 99μg (141% DV) of selenium in a 3 ounce serving.

#4: Fish
Fish is a heart healthy food, a good source of protein, and rich in vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, and B12. Orange roughy provides the most selenium with 88μg (126% DV) per 100 gram serving, 75μg (107% DV) per 3 ounce serving. It is followed by canned tuna, canned anchovies, swordfish, pickled herring, and lastly tilefish which provides 52μg (74% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, or 44μg (63% DV) per 3 ounce serving.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#5: Sunflower Seeds
Sunflower seeds are great as a snack or as an addition to salads, they are also a great source of vitamin E, iron, vitamin B1 (thiamin), B6, protein, magnesium, potassium, and copper. Sunflower seeds provide 79μg (113% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, that is 102μg (145% DV) of selenium per cup hulled, and 22.2μg (32% DV) per ounce.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#6: Bran (Wheat, Rice, and Oat)
Rice, Wheat, and Oat bran are great additions to breads and breakfast cereals like oats, rye, and buckwheat.
Wheat bran contains 78μg (111% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, which is 45μg (64% DV) per cup, and 3μg (4% DV) per tablespoon. Oat bran provides 45μg (65% DV) of selenium per 100 grams, and rice bran contains much less selenium with 17μg per 100 gram serving.

#7: Caviar
Caviar is not as expensive as people think and is a great source of iron, protein, and vitamin B12. 100 grams of caviar will provide 65.5μg (94% DV) of selenium, or 18μg (26% DV) per ounce, 10.5μg (15% DV) per tablespoon.

#8: Bacon and Pork Chops
Despite being a high cholesterol food bacon is a good source of selenium. 100 grams of bacon will provide 65μg (93% DV) of selenium, or 5μg (7% DV) per slice. Lean pork chops provide 43μg (61% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, 31μg (44% DV) per chop.

#9: Lobster and Crab
Lobster is most commonly served baked, steamed, or in bisque. A 100g serving of spiny lobster provides 59.2μg (85% DV) of selenium, that is 96.5μg (138%DV) in a whole lobster, 50.3μg (72% DV) in a 3 ounce serving. Dungeness crab provides 47.6μg (68% DV) per 100 gram serving, 60.5μg (86% DV) per crab, and 40.5μg (58% DV) per 3 ounce serving. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#10: Shrimp (Prawns, Camarones)
Despite being a high cholesterol food shrimps are rich in iron as well as selenium. Shrimps provide 39.6μg (57% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, 34μg (48% DV) per 3 ounce serving, and 8.7μg (12% DV) of selenium in 4 large shrimps.

Fruit juice as bad for your liver as alcohol?

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on November 22, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Fruit juice as bad for your liver as alcohol?
http://www.timeforwellness.org/blog-view/fruit-juice-as-bad-for-your-liver-as-alcohol-40
Posted on Sun, 5 Jul 09

Too many sweet foods such as soda and sweetened fruit juice may be as damaging to your liver as alcohol. A group have reported in The Journal of Nutrition that people who consume more dietary sources of sugars, such as soft drink and sweetened foods, have a high risk of fatty liver disease the same liver disease that may affect regular drinkers and alcoholics [1].

It has been suggested that the reason sugar harms your liver is that it feeds “bad bacteria” in our digestive system causing an overgrowth. These “bad bacteria” then produce toxins that enter the blood stream and damage the liver [2].

Fatty liver disease is common in the general population and often goes undiagnosed. Fatty liver can progress to cirrhosis and is associated with liver cancer. Maintaining a healthy body weight, going for a regular diabetes check and avoiding added sugars in processed foods such as soft drinks, fruit juices, baked goods, cereals and sweets and limiting alcohol consumption are important steps towards reducing the risk of fatty liver.

References

1. Thuy S et al. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in humans is associated with increased plasma endotoxin and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 concentrations and with fructose intake. J Nutr. 2008 Aug;138(8):1452-5.

2. Bergheim L et al. Antibiotics protect against fructose-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in mice: role of endotoxin. J Hepatol. 2008 Jun;48(6):983-92.

Top 10: High-Energy Foods

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 18, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Top 10: High-Energy Foods

Top 10: High-Energy Foods
No.10 Coffee
Of all natural food sources, coffee has the largest caffeine content. Caffeine has been shown to improve performance and decrease your perception of effort, allowing you to work harder longer. Coffee also contains large amounts of antioxidants, and may supply up to 70% of the total daily antioxidant intake of the average American. If you use coffee to give you a quick energy boost, be conscious of the time of day. Drinking coffee within eight hours of when you go to bed can cause some men to have trouble falling asleep and/or staying asleep. If you wake up in the middle of the night with your heart racing, you may have to find a less intense alternative, such as tea.

No.9 Tea
When proper nutrition and hydration fails you (or when you fail it), sometimes a quick caffeine boost can help get you through a training session. Different teas such as white, green, oolong, and black can give you a small amount of caffeine, but they also contain the calming amino acid theanine, which has been shown to prevent the anxiety that large caffeine consumption can cause. This will ultimately help you create better attention and focus. The amount of caffeine per serving depends on the type of tea: white gives about 20 milligrams; green gives about 30 milligrams; oolong gives about 40 milligrams; and black gives about 50 milligrams.

No.8 Water
Water is the most overlooked “performance enhancing” supplement out there. As many as 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated. Dehydration can limit your physical and mental capacity. Because water is paramount in cooling your body during times of increased heat/stress, as you attempt to ramp up your exercise intensity dehydration will cause limitations in thermal regulation, circulation and, ultimately, force production.
The common recommendation is that the average, inactive person (not you) should consume at least six to eight ounces of water per day. In reality, you should probably be taking in about double that (on top of the water you take in from other foods). Start carrying a 16- to 20-ounce water bottle around with you during the day. Aim to refill it every three to four hours. You’ll be amazed at how much energy you get just from staying adequately hydrated. If you notice you’re making more frequent trips to the bathroom, don’t worry; as your body adapts to getting a constant supply of fluid, you’re lavatory frequency will return to more socially acceptable rates.

No.7 Fruits
Fruits (especially apricots, bananas, cantaloupe, and kiwi) are high in potassium (an electrolyte that maintains normal nerve and muscle function), fructose for liver glycogen, ready-to-use sugars, fiber, and tons of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. If you’re looking for a healthy, natural energy boost, consuming fruits throughout the day and within about an hour before you train will give you just that. You can also blend a banana, frozen berries, some nuts/seeds (from above), and Greek yogurt together for a great post-workout drink.

No.6 Quinoa
Quinoa, although technically a seed, is a super-grain that everyone should have as part of their diet. It is a complete protein, which is very rare for a plant food. It is also a high-quality complex carbohydrate high in fiber and iron, as well as calcium (necessary for proper muscle contraction), potassium and magnesium (necessary for proper hydration).

No.5 Old-fashioned oats
Old-fashioned oats are a quality source of complex carbohydrates, high in fiber, low on the glycemic index, and are also high in energy-boosting B-vitamins. This is not your instant oatmeal; old-fashioned oats are a more natural, unprocessed form of oat. Because they aren’t broken down to the extent that instant oats are, it takes longer for these oats to be processed within your body, providing a slower release of energy.

No.4 Seeds
Seeds from sources like flax, chia and hemp provide a great supply of fiber, healthy fats (including omega-3s), vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Chia is an especially great choice, since it has a large amount of soluble fiber, which creates a viscous gel in your gastrointestinal tract. This keeps you full/satisfied for a long time and provides an energy time-release effect, stabilizing your blood sugar and keeping your energy levels even during intense training.

No.3 Tree nuts
Tree nuts such as almonds, walnuts, pecans, and cashews are loaded with healthy fats (monounsaturates like in olive oil, as well as some omega 3s), fiber, protein, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. You can also consume these as nut butters, which are delicious and offer lots of variety as they can be spread over other fruits/vegetables or included in a smoothie for a perfect energy-boosting snack.

No.2 Omega-3 eggs
Omega-3 eggs are full of healthy fats, energy-boosting B-vitamins and some vitamin D. They also provide a rich supply of brain-boosting choline, the precursor for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and are considered the ”perfect” protein because of their amino acid profile and high biological value. They are one of nature’s most nutrient-dense foods.

No.1 Cold-water fatty fish
Cold-water fatty fish include wild salmon, mackerel and herring. These fish are an excellent source of omega-3s, which provide a number of health benefits including decreased risk of heart disease and various cancers, decreased inflammation, and decreased body fat. They’re also rich in complete protein, energy-boosting B-vitamins, magnesium, potassium, and are one of the few food sources of vitamin D.

Iron Deficiency

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on February 3, 2010 by ecofrenfood

Iron helps the body in many important processes. For example, it is an essential part of haemoglobin, the red pigment in our blood that allows it to carry oxygen around the body.

Low iron levels
If iron levels are low, the amount of haemoglobin in our red blood cells, as well as the number of red blood cells, is reduced. This is called anaemia.
Symptoms include tiredness and lethargy, difficulty concentrating and a shortened attention span.

All the tissues and cells in the body depend on oxygen to function properly; if they receive less oxygen, they won’t work so well.

On average, adult men need 8.7mg of iron a day. For women the figure is 14.8mg.

Foods containing iron
Red meat is the richest source of iron. The iron in animal sources is absorbed easily by the body.
There is also iron in pulses (such as lentils and beans), dried fruit, green leafy vegetables, nuts and seeds, and in fortified breakfast cereals. The iron in these foods is not so easily absorbed by the body

Liver is another rich source of iron, but it is also very high in vitamin A. So if you eat liver or liver products such as pâté every week, you might want to choose not to have it more often and you should avoid taking supplements containing vitamin A or fish liver oils (which are high in vitamin A).

People at a higher risk of osteoporosis, which includes women who have been through the menopause and older men, should also avoid having too much vitamin A.

If you’re pregnant, or thinking of becoming pregnant you should avoid eating liver and liver products because of the amount of vitamin A they contain.

Eating a balanced diet that includes food from the iron rich food list can help prevent iron deficiency.

Iron Deficiency Anemia is a condition where a person has inadequate amounts of iron to meet body demands. It is a decrease in the amount of red cells in the blood caused by having too little iron.
Excellent Sources
-Clams
-Pork Liver
-Oysters
-Chicken Liver
-Mussels
-Beef Liver

Good Sources
-Beef
-Shrimp
-Sardines
-Turkey

Recommended daily intake of iron
-Children from birth to age 6 months – 10 mg daily
-Children from ages 6 months to 4 years – 15 mg daily
-Females ages 11 to 50 – 18 mg
-Females over age 50 – 10 mg
-Pregnant women – 30 to 60 mg
-Males ages 10 to 18 – 18 mg
-Males over age 19 – 10 mg

Iron Absorption Enhancers
-Meat/fish/poultry
-Fruits: Orange, Orange Juice, cantaloupe, strawberries, grapefruit etc
-Vegetables: Broccoli, brussels sprouts, tomato, tomato juice, potato, green & red peppers
-White wine

Source: http://www.healthcastle.com/iron.shtml