Archive for Iron

Millet Rice

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 28, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Millet Rice (Korra Buvva, Korra Annam)

What is Millet?

Millet is small, round in shape, and can be white, grey, yellow or red. The most common form in stores is the pearled, hulled kind. It is a tasty grain that has a mildly sweet, nut-like flavor which is intensified when the grain is toasted. The protein content is very close to that of wheat; both provide about 11% protein by weight. Millet is rich in B vitamins (especially niacin, B6 and folic acid), calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. Millet contains no gluten, so it is appropriate for those with celiac disease or gluten/wheat intolerance.


White Bread is bad…

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 12, 2012 by ecofrenfood

White Bread is bad…
Why is bread bad for you?

There are different schools of thought at work here. Some say that even whole wheat commercial bread is better because it is loaded with fiber and its glycemic index is lower. However, what I’m concerned about in processed bread is a pretty nasty ingredient- bromide- and the fact that all the naturally occurring nutrients have been stripped out in the factory process.

I don’t buy the argument that commercial/processed whole wheat bread is still healthy because all the vitamins and minerals (calcium, iron, vitamin E, etc) are added back to the flour as part of the process. Its still no match for the naturally occurring nutrients that were there in the first place! Also, the companies are using them in their synthetic form, which are not able to properly adapt to our bodies.

Processed bread is treated with a variety of chemicals from the ground to production in order to “bleach” the flour and prevent it from sticking- such as:

•insecticides

•fungicides

•benzoyl peroxide or chlorine dioxide (known to cause cancer)

•methyl bromide

•nitrogen trichloride

•alum

•ammonium carbonate

•nitrogen peroxide

Yuck!

These “hidden ingredients” can cause:

•allergies that manifest as bloating, diarrhoea, eczema, asthma, headache or general malaise or lack of energy

•leaky gut syndrome

•growth of unfriendly toxin generating bacteria in the gut

•slowing of bowel transit time, so toxic substances are in contact with the bowel for longer

It sure makes me crazy that someone would buy a refined, processed “whole wheat plus fiber” bread at their grocery store, hoping it is what they need to support the gastrointestinal tract and help flush out toxins. When they are getting the opposite!

So…What’s Bromide?

Bromide is a dough conditioner found in most flours as potassium bromate. It came into use in the 1960’s as an “improvement” on potassium iodate.

I’ll cut to the chase: Bromides disrupts the endocrine system and slow down the metabolism. Because bromide is also a halide (Any organic compound that contains a halogen atom can be considered a halide) it competes for the same receptors that are used in the thyroid gland (among other places) to capture iodine. This will inhibit thyroid hormone production, resulting in a low thyroid state. This throws your metabolism out of whack.

Why on earth do they use it, then?

Some commercial bakers claim they use bromated flour because it yields dependable results, and it makes more elastic dough which can stand up to bread hooks and other commercial baking tools.

The UK banned bromate in bread in 1990. ?Canada banned bromate in bread in 1994.

Back in 1999, the Center for Science in the Public Interest petitioned the FDA to prohibit the use of potassium bromate, charging that the FDA had known for years that bromate causes cancer in lab animals, but had failed to ban it.

http://janicewhite.hubpages.com/hub/why-white-bread-is-bad-for-you

Nutrition Label

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 7, 2012 by ecofrenfood


Food labels provide nutrition facts and information about the foods that your family eats.
From the amount of calories, fiber, and total fat grams, to the food’s ingredients, the food label is your key to the nutrition information in the foods you provide to your family.

It can help you to increase the healthy nutrients that you want your family to eat, like calcium and fiber, and limit nutrients that can be unhealthy, like fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium.

And reading food labels can you to compare foods that you are going to buy and choose foods that are more healthy than others.

The serving size and amount of servings per container is your real key to knowing how many calories and other nutrients are in the foods your family eats.
In general, a food with:

40 calories per serving is low in calories
100 calories per serving is moderate in calories
400 calories or more per serving is high in calories
Remember that many packages contain more than one serving and a typical serving is not necessarily the amount you can eat at one time.
For example, the nutrition label pictured above contains two servings in each container. So if you eat the whole thing by yourself, you are actually eating 500 calories (250 calories per serving X two servings), and not just 250 calories as the label makes it appear.

A common way that people overeat is by consuming oversized portions and underestimating how many calories are in the foods they eat. To help avoid this, you might choose to buy single serving packages or remove a single serving from a larger package and don’t eat out of the bag or box itself. Repackaging large bags or boxes of food into smaller, single serving packages can also be helpful.

http://pediatrics.about.com/od/nutrition/ss/food_labels_2.htm

FATS

Understanding the amount of Total Fat in the foods you eat is important so that you can provide your kids with a low fat diet.
Also keep in mind that unsaturated fats are more healthy than saturated fats and trans fats.

And remember that the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that everyone ‘older than 2 are urged to limit their fat intake to 30 percent or less of daily calories, and to keep saturated fat to no more than one third of total fat, or 10 percent of calories.’

So reading the above food label, you should realize that this isn’t the most healthy food for your child to be eating. In addition to being very high in Sodium (which we will discuss later), about 44% of its calories are from fat (110 Fat Cal/250 Calories per serving). Plus it is high in saturated fat, which you just learned you are supposed to limit.

Bad Fats

In general, solid fats contain a lot of saturated fats and/or trans fats. These include many animal products and hydrogenated vegetable oils, including butter, beef fat, chicken fat, pork fat (lard), stick margarine, and shortening.
Most vegetable oils (except coconut oil and palm kernal oil), on the other hand, contain more monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.

Trans Fats

Although the amount of trans fats isn’t yet listed on most food labels, you can often identify that they are in a food if it lists ‘partially hydrogenated vegetable oil’ on the ingredient list.
In 2006, the amount of trans fats will be listed on food labels.

Carbohydrates

Unless you are on the Atkins Diet, carbohydrates should be an important source of calories in your diet.
In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics states that ‘after infancy, children should get about half of their daily calories from carbohydrates.’

Good Carbs

The type of carbs you eat is important though. Instead of foods high in Simple Sugars, you should choose ‘starchy foods like whole grain breads and cereals, beans and rice, potatoes, and pasta.’
Example of whole grain foods include whole wheat bread, brown rice, whole wheat pasta, and whole grain cereals. These are healthier than their refined alternative – white bread, white rice, etc.

Bad Carbs

In addition to choosing foods that don’t have a lot of sugars in them, you can check the ingredient list to avoid foods with added sugars. If things like corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, fruit juice concentrate, maltose, dextrose, sucrose, honey, or maple syrup, are listed in the first few ingredients, then the food does have added sugars and you might look for a alternative with less sugar.

http://pediatrics.about.com/od/nutrition/ss/food_labels_4.htm

Dietary Fiber

Fiber is an important part of a healthy diet and most experts recommend that both children and adults eat a high fiber diet.
According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, ‘people who eat a lot of fiber are less likely to be obese, have heart disease, or develop problems affecting the bowel, including constipation and cancer.’

Eating a lot of foods high in fiber is especially important to prevent and treat constipation in your children.

How much fiber do kids need? The general recommendation is that the amount of fiber that they eat each day should be equal to their age in years plus 5. So a 5 year old needs 10g of fiber each day and a 12 year old needs about 17g.

Foods that are usually high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, and whole grain cereals and breads. And reading food labels can help you to choose foods that are high in fiber. For example, the food label pictured above shows just 1g of dietary fiber, while a food high in fiber, like a can of vegetable soup, might have 4 or 5g of fiber per serving.

Vitamins and Minerals

Reading food labels can also help you find foods that are high in certain vitamins and minerals that your kids need, like calcium and iron.
Remember that 5% DV or less is low and 20% DV or more is high for a food component. Foods that are a good source for a particular vitamin contain between 10 to 19% DV of that nutrient in each serving. So this example is not a good source for any of the vitamins or minerals listed on the food label.

Keep in mind that calcium rich foods contain about 20 to 30 percent of a child’s percent daily value per serving. If your child doesn’t drink a lot of milk or other dairy products that are high in calcium, be sure to check the food labels and find foods high in calcium to make sure that your child gets enough.

Also be aware that teens need more than the 100% DV listed on food labels. They actually need 130% DV of calcium and that makes choosing high calcium foods even more important.

By checking the Calcium % in foods, you will see that certain products, like orange juice, can have any where between 5 and 30% calcium, so check those food labels.

Cholesterol Sodium Protein

Like fat, you should limit the amount of cholesterol and sodium in your child’s diet.
If you consider that 5% DV or less is low and 20% DV or more is high, you can see that the food label pictured above is high in both cholesterol and sodium.

A good way to find foods that are low in sodium is to read labels and choose those foods that have less than 140 mg of sodium per serving or that are labeled as being ‘low in sodium’ or ‘very low in sodium.’

To find foods that are low in cholesterol, look for foods with less than 20 mg of cholesterol per serving.

Protein

Many of today’s popular diets, such as Atkins and the South Beach Diet, put an emphasis on eating a lot of protein and avoiding carbs. However, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, protein should only ‘make up about 10 to 12 percent of each day’s calories.’ And keep in mind that most children in America get more protein than they need in their diet, especially if they eat meat, eggs, milk products, and a variety of plant based foods, such as beans, nuts, and soy products.

Percent Daily Value

Understanding the Percent Daily Values on a food label can help you choose foods that are high in good nutrients and low in bad nutrients.
Remember that 5% DV or less is low and 20% DV or more is high for a food component. So for things like fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, or sodium, look for foods with a low % DV. For these nutrients, you should try to eat less than the 100% DV.

And look for a high % DV for ‘good things,’ like dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, and iron. You should be eating at least the 100% DV for these nutrients.

One thing to consider is that the % DV is based on a 2,000 calorie diet, which is the average energy needs for a child that is 7-10 years old. So for your older children and teens, they will likely need more than 100% DV.

Also remember that the Percent Daily Values are listed for a single serving, so if you eat two servings, you should double %DV. For this food label, you can see that eating two servings provides your kids with almost 80% of their Percent Daily Value of sodium!

Ingredients

Reviewing the ingredients list is important, especially if your kids have food allergies. Reading the food label pictured above, you can see that this food has cow’s milk, wheat flour, and eggs, so wouldn’t be a good idea for a child with a milk, wheat and/or egg allergy.
The ingredient list can also help you identify ‘hidden’ ingredients, like added sugars (bad), whole grains (good), and trans fats (bad).

Added Sugars

Foods with added sugars will list corn syrup, fruit juice concentrates, honey, molasses, etc. on their ingredient list. Other names for added sugars can include:
brown sugar
corn sweetener
dextrose
fructose
glucose
high-fructose corn syrup
invert sugar
lactose
maltose
malt syrup
raw sugar
sucrose
sugar
syrup
Whole Grains

The ingredient list can also help you find foods made with whole grains, which are healthier and are preferred to refined grains. Whole grain foods should have one of the following whole grain ingredients listed as their first ingredient:
whole wheat
whole oats
brown rice
bulgar
graham flour
oatmeal
whole grain corn
whole rye
wild rice
On the other hand, a food is not made with whole grains if it is labeled with the words multi-grain, 100% wheat, seven-grain, stone-ground, bran, or cracked wheat.
Trans Fats

Although the amount of trans fats isn’t yet listed on most food labels, making them hard to avoid, you can often identify that they are in a food if it lists ‘partially hydrogenated vegetable oil’ on the ingredient list.

http://pediatrics.about.com/od/nutrition/ss/food_labels_9.htm

sweet potato leaves

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 2, 2011 by ecofrenfood

TAKE SWEET POTATO LEAVES

Many people are familiar with sweet potatoes – the tuber we use for cooking, baking or making desserts. But do you know that the leaves of the sweet potato plant can be eaten as well? Known as Fun Shee Yip in Cantonese, the leaves are tender; have a nicely-balanced flavor, with not even a hint of bitterness. Its nutritional content is said to be comparable to the spinach. The leaves contain dietary fiber, lipid, and essential minerals-&-nutrients such as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, sulfur, iron, copper, zinc, manganese, aluminum and boron. They are also good sources of vitamin A ( very high content; good for skin-care ), thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and ascorbic acid. The leaves are high in protein, making it a perfect intake for vegetarians.

The bioactive compounds contained in SPL play a role in health-promotion by improving our immune function; reducing oxidative stress and free radical damage; reducing cardiovascular disease risk, and suppressing cancer cell-growth.

You can cook SPL in every way that you normally cook other greens. You can use it in soups. You can also stir-fry it or blanche it.


Apart from being tasty, this simple vegetable is packed with nutrition, being the only vegetable with Iodine, a common substance found in seafood. It also contains vitamin A, C and Calcium; In the Philippines, it is widely believed that lactating mothers fed sweet potato tops improve their breast milk production. In fact, it is now a major ingredient of a commercially available food supplement drink in the Philippines. It is also a folk remedy which is used to treat diarrhea and dizziness.

Iron Deficiency

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on February 3, 2010 by ecofrenfood

Iron helps the body in many important processes. For example, it is an essential part of haemoglobin, the red pigment in our blood that allows it to carry oxygen around the body.

Low iron levels
If iron levels are low, the amount of haemoglobin in our red blood cells, as well as the number of red blood cells, is reduced. This is called anaemia.
Symptoms include tiredness and lethargy, difficulty concentrating and a shortened attention span.

All the tissues and cells in the body depend on oxygen to function properly; if they receive less oxygen, they won’t work so well.

On average, adult men need 8.7mg of iron a day. For women the figure is 14.8mg.

Foods containing iron
Red meat is the richest source of iron. The iron in animal sources is absorbed easily by the body.
There is also iron in pulses (such as lentils and beans), dried fruit, green leafy vegetables, nuts and seeds, and in fortified breakfast cereals. The iron in these foods is not so easily absorbed by the body

Liver is another rich source of iron, but it is also very high in vitamin A. So if you eat liver or liver products such as pâté every week, you might want to choose not to have it more often and you should avoid taking supplements containing vitamin A or fish liver oils (which are high in vitamin A).

People at a higher risk of osteoporosis, which includes women who have been through the menopause and older men, should also avoid having too much vitamin A.

If you’re pregnant, or thinking of becoming pregnant you should avoid eating liver and liver products because of the amount of vitamin A they contain.

Eating a balanced diet that includes food from the iron rich food list can help prevent iron deficiency.

Iron Deficiency Anemia is a condition where a person has inadequate amounts of iron to meet body demands. It is a decrease in the amount of red cells in the blood caused by having too little iron.
Excellent Sources
-Clams
-Pork Liver
-Oysters
-Chicken Liver
-Mussels
-Beef Liver

Good Sources
-Beef
-Shrimp
-Sardines
-Turkey

Recommended daily intake of iron
-Children from birth to age 6 months – 10 mg daily
-Children from ages 6 months to 4 years – 15 mg daily
-Females ages 11 to 50 – 18 mg
-Females over age 50 – 10 mg
-Pregnant women – 30 to 60 mg
-Males ages 10 to 18 – 18 mg
-Males over age 19 – 10 mg

Iron Absorption Enhancers
-Meat/fish/poultry
-Fruits: Orange, Orange Juice, cantaloupe, strawberries, grapefruit etc
-Vegetables: Broccoli, brussels sprouts, tomato, tomato juice, potato, green & red peppers
-White wine

Source: http://www.healthcastle.com/iron.shtml