Archive for ice-cream

Delicious food, disgusting ingredient

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 17, 2013 by ecofrenfood

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Delicious food, disgusting ingredients

By  |  – Tue, Jun 7, 2011

On the latest episode of Jaimie Oliver’s Food Revolutionthe food activist chef came up with a brilliant way to break kids of their sweet tooth habit. He showed them what their desserts are really made of. Each kid got to make his or her own sundae and after they gobbled it down, he broke down some of more revolting ingredients in their high-calorie grub. It’s a radical approach but it may just be the cure for those late night binges. With that in mind, we collected some disgusting byproducts found in our favorite foods, to brainwash us into eating less of it. Will it work? It’s worth a shot. 

L-Cyesteine is a dough conditioner used in mass-produced bread products like bagels, donuts, rolls and crackers. And guess what’s needed to make L-Cyesteine? Hair. A recent study by the Vegetarian Resource Group found that human hair and hog hair were still used industry-wide, giving new meaning to the term “all-natural”.

 

The ingredient used to keep many packaged shredded cheeses from clumping is powdered cellulose, which is a fancy way of saying wood pulp that’s been chemically processed. Look out for the ingredient in your ice cream too. 


Secret ingredient: Sheep secretions-
The oils released from the fur of a sheep is the “gum base” used in many types of chewing gums for extra-moisture.

Secret Ingredient: cleaning agent-
Sodium bisulfite is a preservative used for bleaching out the discolorations and extending the lifespan of your average potato chip. It’s also an ingredient in most toilet bowl cleaners.

Secret Ingredient: crushed bugs-
Cochineal extract is a kind of red food dye found in many red-colored candies, sprinkles, strawberry flavored yogurts, jello, popsicles and most other “fruit-flavored” goodies. Turns out it’s not fruit responsible for the redness. The extract is actually made from the crushed and dried bodies of a red-colored insect called Dactylopius coccus costa. Still want to order dessert?

http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/delicious-food-disgusting-ingredients-2494322.html

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Salted Caramel Ice Cream

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on October 20, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Salted Caramel Ice Cream
Gourmet | August 2009
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Salted-Caramel-Ice-Cream-354517

yield: Makes about 1 quart

active time: 30 min

total time: 4 hr

It might seem odd to describe something cold—ice cream—as sultry, but there is no denying genuine come-hither appeal. Based on a traditional candy from Brittany (and a favorite flavor pairing among French and American chefs), the combination of salty and sweet exerts an almost primordial pull, and cream, milk, and eggs provide lush, luxurious texture

Ingredients
1 1/4 cups sugar, divided
2 1/4 cups heavy cream, divided
1/2 teaspoon flaky sea salt such as Maldon
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 cup whole milk
3 large eggs

Equipment: an ice cream maker

Preparation
Heat 1 cup sugar in a dry 10-inch heavy skillet over medium heat, stirring with a fork to heat sugar evenly, until it starts to melt, then stop stirring and cook, swirling skillet occasionally so sugar melts evenly, until it is dark amber.

Add 1 1/4 cups cream (mixture will spatter) and cook, stirring, until all of caramel has dissolved. Transfer to a bowl and stir in sea salt and vanilla. Cool to room temperature.

Meanwhile, bring milk, remaining cup cream, and remaining 1/4 cup sugar just to a boil in a small heavy saucepan, stirring occasionally.

Lightly whisk eggs in a medium bowl, then add half of hot milk mixture in a slow stream, whisking constantly. Pour back into saucepan and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until custard coats back of spoon and registers 170°F on an instant-read thermometer (do not let boil). Pour custard through a fine-mesh sieve into a large bowl, then stir in cooled caramel.

Chill custard, stirring occasionally, until very cold, 3 to 6 hours. Freeze custard in ice cream maker (it will still be quite soft), then transfer to an airtight container and put in freezer to firm up.

Cooks’ note:
Ice cream keeps 1 week.

Black Ice-cream

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 10, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Japanese Black Sesame Ice Cream

Black Sesame Ice Cream and Grass Jelly

Black Forest ice cream

10 Weird Ice-Cream around the world

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 9, 2010 by ecofrenfood

1. Horse Meat
For various reasons, consumption of horse meat is a taboo for most people. However, when it comes to Japan, their food concepts are radically different. Well known for consumption of raw seafood as Sushis and Sashamis, the Japanese also savor a relatively unknown raw delicacy known as Basashi or raw horse meat. Now just imagine an ice cream not only flavored with a noble steed but with real chewy stallion chunks inside. I can hear my stomach rumbling.
2. Hot Ice Cream
The delightfully named ‘Cold Sweat’ is claimed to be a concoction of some of the hottest peppers known to man. Anyone willing to try has to sign a waiver which, among many other stern warnings, mentions that “what is painful going in, may be painful upon exit”. A deadly dose can be sampled at Sunni Sky’s Homemade Ice cream, Angier, NC.
3. Condom
This one was perhaps an unintentional creation from a Korean manufacturer who just wanted to sell a fun ice cream for kids to suck on. Turns out that the swollen, latex coated thing which comes out of the cute turtle wrapper might not be the right shape for a kid. And, for those of you who are curious, the flavor is regular chocolate.
4. Squid Ink
The amazing Japanese inventory of seafood flavored ice creams has an array of superstars like Fish, Octopus, Crab, Shrimp, Eel and Whale but this cold black thing just takes the biscuit.
5. Foie Gras
From the ultra luxurious French ice cream specialists Phillippe Faur. Foie Gras is the liver of a duck or goose fattened by force feeding. This decadent dessert with a ‘mineraly’ kick will set you back by around $150.
6. The Sex Pistol
Although it can be found in different varieties around the world, London based “Icecreamists” have claimed to perfect the art of the Viagra ice cream. Their energizing treat contains a variety of mysterious aphrodisiacs such as Ginkgo, Biloba, Arginine, Guaranaans and is served with a shot of La Fee Absinthe. So even if you are in fine working condition, you might want to try this blend just for the awesome presentation.
7. Garlic
Gilroy, California calls itself the garlic capital of the word and legend is that you can smell the town before you get there. Well this might also be true for the Garlic ice cream which is a popular attraction at the annual Gilroy Garlic Festival. Despite the weirdness, this flavor actually has a good reputation.
8. Blue Cheese
This smelly, moldy and repulsive ice cream is actually quite popular, with the Blue Stilton variety being frequently encountered in recipes. Although “Seriously Stilton” is only 25% Stilton, it strongly retains the “strictly acquired taste” tag.
9. Ammonia Nastiness
This highly localized delicacy is made from Salty Licorice, a snack not generally known outside northern Europe. The ice cream has substantial amounts of Ammonia, which can rampage through your sinuses and cause nausea.
10. Pit Viper
Japanese innovation knows no limits and certainly runs wild when it comes to ice creams. By putting a poisonous reptile into an ice cream tub, they have certainly raised the creativity bar to a whole new level. Food commando Andrew Zimmern tried this vile milk-snake mash and compared the taste with “bile”. Although on the positive side, the Pit Viper is believed by the Japanese to have aphrodisiac powers.

How To Make Ice Cream in a Bag in 5 Minutes

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on February 7, 2010 by ecofrenfood

How To Make Ice Cream in a Bag in 5 Minutes

Here’s a pretty damned simple ice-cream recipe: combine ingredients in a baggie. Fill a bigger baggie with ice, salt and the baggie of ingredients. Shake for five minutes. Ice cream. Who knew?

Source: http://digg.com/odd_stuff/How_To_Make_Ice_Cream_in_a_Bag_in_5_Minutes