Archive for healthy

Taiwan Reels From Gutter Oil Scandal

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2014 by ecofrenfood

Taiwan Reels From Gutter Oil Scandal

Less meat ‘key’ to food security

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2014 by ecofrenfood

Less meat ‘key’ to food security

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http://news.uk.msn.com/uk/articles?cp-documentid=261848975

Eating less meat is “essential” to ensure future demand for food can be met and “dangerous” climate change avoided, experts have warned.

A study by leading university researchers in Cambridge and Aberdeen found food production alone could exceed targets for greenhouse gas emissions in 2050 if current trends continue.

Population growth and the global shift towards “meat-heavy Western diets” has meant increasing agricultural yields will not meet projected food demands for the expected 9.6 billion world population, it said.

Increased deforestation, fertiliser use and livestock methane emissions are likely to cause greenhouse gas emissions from food production to rise by almost 80%, experts from the University of Cambridge and University of Aberdeen found.

Lead researcher Bojana Bajzelj, from the University of Cambridge’s department of engineering, said: “Agricultural practices are not necessarily at fault here – but our choice of food is.

“It is imperative to find ways to achieve global food security without expanding crop or pastureland.

“Food production is a main driver of biodiversity loss and a large contributor to climate change and pollution, so our food choices matter.”

He added: “Cutting food waste and moderating meat consumption in more balanced diets, are the essential ‘no-regrets’ options.”

According to the study in Nature Climate Change, current trends in food production will mean that by 2050 cropland will have expanded by 42% and fertiliser use increased by 45% over 2009 levels.

A further tenth of the world’s pristine tropical forests would disappear over the next 35 years, it said.

The study’s authors tested a scenario where all countries were assumed to have an “average” balanced diet – without excessive consumption of sugars, fats, and meat products.

The average balanced diet used in the study was a “relatively achievable goal”, the researchers said, which included two 85g portions of red meat and five eggs per week, as well as a portion of poultry a day.

“This significantly reduced the pressures on the environment even further,” they said.

Co-author Professor Pete Smith, from the University of Aberdeen, said: “Unless we make some serious changes in food consumption trends, we would have to completely de-carbonise the energy and industry sectors to stay within emissions budgets that avoid dangerous climate change.

“That is practically impossible – so, as well as encouraging sustainable agriculture, we need to re-think what we eat.”

Cambridge co-author Prof Keith Richards said: “This is not a radical vegetarian argument; it is an argument about eating meat in sensible amounts as part of healthy, balanced diets.

“Managing the demand better, for example by focusing on health education, would bring double benefits – maintaining healthy populations, and greatly reducing critical pressures on the environment.”

14 Things People Probably Do Not Want To Know About Their Favorite Foods

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 24, 2013 by ecofrenfood

14 Things People Probably Do Not Want To Know About Their Favorite Foods

November 4, 2013 | By |

April McCarthy, Prevent Disease
Waking Times

There are hundreds of food industry facts that are sheltered from consumers and only made public by food scientists if absolutely necessary. The following are 14 of the more well known industry insider secrets that have been exposed now for some time, but still not common knowledge to millions of consumers.

Many consumer watchdogs have found that food label claims such as ‘pure’, ‘fresh’, ‘non-artificial’, ‘natural’ and ‘real’ are largely unregulated and false when these claims are investigated. Moreover, the processing of most foods, ingredients used in manufacturing, their byproducts, waste management and other details are often kept hidden from the public until they’ve been exposed by those willing to publicize the information.

1. The manufacturing of Greek yogurt produces millions of tons of toxic waste every year, and nobody knows what to do with it.

For every three or four ounces of milk, companies who manufacture greek yogurt can produce only one ounce of creamy Greek yogurt. The rest becomes acid whey. It’s a thin, runny waste product that can’t simply be dumped. Not only would that be illegal, but whey decomposition is toxic to the natural environment, robbing oxygen from streams and rivers. That could turn a waterway into what one expert calls a “dead sea,” destroying aquatic life over potentially large areas. Spills of cheese whey, a cousin of Greek yogurt whey, have killed tens of thousands of fish around the country in recent years.The $2 billion Greek yogurt market and state government officials are scrambling not just to figure out uses for whey, but how to make a profit off of it. Source

2. All grocery retail orange juice that is “not from concentrate” is processed with “artificial flavor” to ensure that each bottle tastes exactly the same.

No matter what time of year and regardless of the origin of oranges, large juice manufacturers like Pepsico are consistently blending perfectly flavored orange juice specifically through carefully controlled processes and artificial flavor calibration. These mixtures are added to replace the natural flavors lost when the juice chemically separates oxygen (“deaerates” ) to be able to maintain shelf life for more than one year without oxidizing.

Because the added flavor is technically derived from orange oil extract (although it is completely, artifically and a chemically manufactured derivative), it does not need to be specifically listed in the ingredients.Source

3. Vegetarian burgers are far more toxic than conventional beef patties.

More than 99% of vegetarian burgers at grocery retailers are made with soy protein isolate (aka textured vegetable protein, aka soy meal). These substances derived from defatted soy flour are mostly used in pet foods, but sweetened up with sugar and spices to help improve their taste. Soy oil is generally separated from flaked soybeans — leaving defatted meal that’s ground into flour — using a chemical called hexane, one of the volatile organic compounds that constitutes natural gas, crude oil and gasoline. Since more than 95% of soy is also genetically modified, you’re also getting a nice dose of transgenic DNA in your veggie burgers.The Cornucopia Institute, a U.S.-based progressive farm policy outfit, had samples of soy oil, soy meal and soy grits tested, and both the soy meal and soy grits exceeded the hexane limit in food of 10 parts per million. A bigger question we might be asking ourselves is why there is a hexane limit in our foods in the first place??? Source

4. Conventional milk is made by high heating, homogenizing, pasteurizing, re-packing and combining the milk of hundreds of cows fed genetically modified grain and injected with hormones.

Old-time farmers will say they can tell where their cows have been grazing by the taste of the milk. By contrast, the milk we buy in supermarkets will be uniformly white. Its cream won’t rise. And a lactic perfume will be detectable only if the milk is ultra heated.Cows are kept in herds of about 800 and fed not grass, but standardized mixes of genetically modified grains, old citrus, alfalfa and nut husks. Today, according to UC Davis estimates, about a third of the herds in California are treated with hormones to increase production. The milk will be standardized, fortified, pasteurized and homogenized. Translated, this means that it will be taken apart and put back together again, not always in the same proportions. Then it will be cooked and emulsified. At that point do you think it’s still milk? Source

5. Producers of maraschino cherries chemically bleach (through a preserved brine solution) and then marinate the cherries in huge vats of corn syrup and food coloring (FD&C Red 40) to make the cherries red againSource1 Source2

progressosoup_nImage Source

The food additive “MSG” is a slow poison which hides behind dozens of names, such as natural flavouring and yeast extract. Currently, labeling standards do not require MSG to be listed in the ingredient list of thousands of foods.

Secretly, soup manufacturers admit that they have refered to MSG as “natural” (that is refined from vegetable protein and yeast) and establish it in the list of ingredients as ” yeast extract “or” hydrolyzed protein. “War of ads broke in 2008 because Campbell and Progresso were so worried that customers would not buy soup if they knew the amount of MSG containing. Source

7. Processed canned soups go through such violent processing that manufacturers must grow mutant sized vegetables so they don’t disintegrate in the soup.

The food you make at home isn’t reheated while being violently shaken. In order to destroy any pathogens, FDA requirements dictate that soup, once canned, be heated to 250 degrees; many manufacturers speed that process by agitating the can, thereby ensuring that the heat distributes itself more rapidly. This requirement changes the flavor of soup also changes the way the soup itself is actually made.Soup companies shy away from ingredients that break down in the canning process so they grow special freakish mutant vegetables like carrots which look like tree limbs–they’re like baseball bats. But once they go through the cooking process, they come out looking like the small young ones that you’d put into your soup. Source

8. Most ice creams are thickened and stabilized with a slew of toxic ingredients. 

These include a variety of emulsifiers which prevent the ice cream from destabilizing. They include polysorbate 80, potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate, carrageenan, xanthan gum, guar gum and soy lecithin. If your store brand or parlor ice cream melts rapidly, that’s a good sign as it likely has a low overrun and little fat destabilization, which means a lower percentage of toxic emulsifiers and stabilizers. Source

9. Hot dogs are filled with a sticky mixture of cuts of mechanically separated chicken, pork, fats and starch or “grain fillers.”

The red or light brown dog varieties usually on sale everywhere contain very little real meat. Instead, they are made up of 64 percent mechanically-recovered chicken and 17 percent is pork. Mechanically-recovered meat is the slimy paste created when a carcass — stripped of all traditional cuts — is forced through a metal sieve or blasted with water. The process is banned for beef, but is permitted for pigs and poultry, and the meat produced is ten times cheaper than normal meat.Most hot dogs typically contain, high fructose corn syrup, starch, milk protein, sodium nitrite, flavors, potassium and sodium triphosphates, polyphosphates (E452), sodium ascorbate and carmine. Source

10. Many olive oils “extra virgin” imported (and expensive) are actually made with cheaper oils of seeds and nuts.

To boost profits, for example, some producers have been caught adulterating the oil they label as “extra virgin” with much cheaper hazelnut, soy, or sunflower seed oil, among others, as well as mislabeling its country of origin.

Read the fascinating (and hilarious) report by Tom Mueller on olive oil fraud business, that eventually became the book Extra Virginity: The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil. Source

11. Food products that are red and pink are often dyed with cochineal extract, also known as tiny crushed insect bodies.

Cochineal extract sometimes appears as carminic acid or carmine. You can learn more about the process of making the dye hereSource

12. Coffee creamer is made from corn syrup and (trans fatty acids/hydrogenated) vegetable oils.There is no cream. These are the ingredients listed on the label of the original liquid cremora Coffee – Mate:

WATER
SOLIDA VEGETABLE OIL
MOSTLY HYDROGEN SOYBEAN AND / OR COTTON SEED OIL
LESS THAN 2% OF SODIUM CASEINATE (DERIVED FROM MILK)
Dipotassium
Mono-and diglycerides
SODIUM ALUMINOSILICATE
ARTIFICIAL FLAVOR
CARRAGEENAN
Source

13. To make bacon, the pork bellies hanging in this strange wash cabinet are bathed in a shower of “liquid smoke”.
The creepy red rain converts the flesh tints to a more familiar color of bacon that consumers desire. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is investigating the safety of liquid smoke as a food flavoring. Source

14. Shredded cheese is packed with refined wood pulp to prevent sticking.

Cellulose made of decomposed plant fibers (including wood) and is a common food additive to make make ice cream creamier or thicken salad dressing without adding calories. Since it is natural, even packaged foods labeled as organic often include cellulose. Mmmmm Sawdust! Yummy.

About the Author

April McCarthy is a community journalist playing an active role reporting and analyzing world events to advance our health and eco-friendly initiatives.

VIETNAMESE STYLE LEMONGRASS PASTE

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 22, 2013 by ecofrenfood

 VIETNAMESE STYLE LEMONGRASS PASTE

The paste we can keep in refrigerator for 1 month and can be used in different recipes. Lemongrass chicken dish is quite famous in Vietnamese restaurants.

INGREDIENTS

  • 10 stalks of lemongrass if it is small like I pictured or 4 to 5 if you take big stalks
  • 1 ½ inch ginger
  • 8 nos of garlic pods
  • 18 nos of dry red chilly-according to your tolerance
  •  1/3 cup of cooking oil

METHOD

  • Remove the outer part of lemongrass stalk if it is dry and dirty and all together above stated except cooking oil. Add some amount of water during grinding

  • In a cooking pot bring the paste to boil and reduce the water content.
  • Add cooking oil , stir well and reduce the heat to medium low and cook until the paste become a kind of crunchy as shown in picture.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF LEMONGRASS

 Anti-Cancer : Citral Can Kill Cancer Cell

Doctors and reseachers have discovered that 1 gram of lemongrass contains enough Citral to prompt cancer cells to commit suicide! Citral has been shown to cause apoptosis (self destruct) in cancer cells.

Anti-Oxidant

A recent study by the Food and Nutrition Research Institue of the department of Science and Technology (DOST) claims that every 100 grams of edible lemon grass, when boiled can contain up to 24.205 micrograms of beta-carotene the powerful anti-oxidant that scientist believe can help prevent cancer.

Detoxification

Lemongrass helps to clean the kidney, liver, pancreas, digestive tract, bladder etc and removes unwanted toxic substances through the urine.

Reduce Blood Pressure and Cholesterol

Being a detoxifier, lemongrass contains citral that removes excess cholesterol, uric acid, toxins and fats from the body. This stimulates blood circulation throughout the body. Drinking a glass of Citralife lemongrass herbal tea everyday helps to reduce blood pressure.

Constipation

It helps in throwing away the toxic substances from the body and is the ideal cleanser for the pancreas, liver, colon, bladder and kidney.  It is easy on the stomach and aids in proper digestion.

Help to Cope with Stress

Hypertensive patients are given daily dose of lemon grass concoction as it helps to maintain their blood pressure levels and keeps them calm and cool. This refreshing drink raises the resistance levels in our body.

Arthritis, Gout and Sprains

Lemongrass are ideal for people suffering from arthritis problems. Patients suffering from ailments like bone related problems and osteoarthritis are highly benefited by using lemongrass.

Fever, Flu and Cold

This lemongrass has amazing medicinal properties and is used since ages. As this grass helps to get rid of fever, it is also know as fever grass.

COURTESY-http://lemongrassherbal.blogspot.sg/

Food, too, is wasted on the young

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 11, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Food, too, is wasted on the young
by Alexandra Smith

A LAST-MINUTE decision to eat out regardless of what is at home in the fridge, a poor understanding of best-before dates and lazy shopping habits mean young people are among the biggest culprits of food waste in NSW.
Figures from the state government’s Love Food Hate Waste campaign show that people aged 18-24 waste between $24.90 and $26 of food every week, contributing to the $2.5 billion of food thrown away in NSW each year.
Fresh food is the most likely to hit the bin, followed by leftovers and packaged or long-life food, the figures reveal.
The Australian arm of the international aid agency Oxfam is so concerned about the amount of food young people waste in NSW it is has launched an online program to encourage consumers to change their habits.

With funding from the NSW Environment Protection Authority’s grants program, Oxfam Australia will urge young people to upload their solutions to food waste and have a role in tackling global hunger.
The Design for Change co-ordinator at Oxfam Australia, Sophie Weldon, said the campaign was about raising awareness. “Almost a third of food produced for human consumption is either lost or wasted,” Ms Weldon said.
“There is enough food to feed the total global population of 7 billion people, yet almost 1 billion people go hungry every night.”
Ms Weldon said young consumers were less likely to have routines, which made it more difficult to avoid wasting food. They were also less inclined to stick to a shopping budget.
Ms Weldon said the best ideas shared through the campaign would be selected for publication in an e-book and distributed to organisations working on reducing food waste in Australia.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/food-too-is-wasted-on-the-young-20120719-22d32.html#ixzz268ViCdyV

Bad habit

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2012 by ecofrenfood

BAD HABITS (Don’t, Don’t, Don’t , DON’T!!!)
For goodness sake don’t eat your nails
They’re made from glue and bits of snails
So if you chew and bite them back
You’ll grow a shell upon your back!

For goodness sake don’t hold your breath
It’s something that can make you deaf
For if your ears fill up with air
You’ll never hear again, I swear!

For goodness sake don’t scratch your bum
‘Cause (I was told this by my mum)
If you should scratch yours every day
You’ll end up scratching it away!

For goodness sake don’t pick your nose,
From this would come the worst of woes,
If you commit this dreadful sin,
Eventually your face caves in!

George Ansell

Foods High in Salt

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 7, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Foods High in Salt
Child Nutrition Basics

By Vincent Iannelli, M.D., About.com Guide

Adults often know that they should avoid a lot of added salt in their diets, and in fact, are sometimes on salt restriction diets because of health problems, especially high blood pressure.

Eating salt is often thought to be less of a problem for kids though, as many parents assume that their kids don’t have a lot of salt in their diets. This is only true if you don’t add much salt to the foods that you cook. Keep in mind that many of the processed and prepared foods that are popular with parents and kids — usually because they are quick and easy — are often loaded with salt.

Some of the Oscar Meyer Lunchables, for example, can have up to 1440mg of sodium per serving.

Why is monitoring your child’s salt intake important? Some studies have reported that children with low-salt diets may avoid high blood pressure as adults. And maybe even more important, salt intake has been linked to childhood obesity, as kids with high-salt diets have been reported to drink a lot of high-sugar, high-calorie drinks, which increases their risk for obesity.

Foods High in Salt

Of course, any foods to which you add table salt (sodium chloride) will be high in salt.

In addition, foods that are usually high in sodium (more than 400mg per serving) include:

Onion soup
Foods made with seasoned bread crumbs
Sauerkraut
Spaghetti sauce (ready to serve)
Potato salad
Cheese sauce
Baked beans with franks
Macaroni and cheese
Pizza slice
Cheeseburgers, hamburgers, hot dogs, tacos, and many other fast foods
Beef stew (from a can)
Cottage cheese
Minestrone soup
Submarine sandwiches
Tunafish salad
Pretzels, potato chips, and other snacks
Sliced ham, bologna, salami and other cold cuts
Cream-style corn (from a can)
Pickles
Beef jerky snacks
Egg bagels

This is just a partial list, but reviewing it and then getting in the habit of reading food labels can help you spot other foods high in salt. As you can now see, high-salt items are typically many canned foods (especially soups), cold cuts, snack foods, and fast food.

Low Salt Diet

Most kids don’t actually need a low-salt diet. Instead, they need a normal salt diet and to learn to avoid too many foods that are high in salt and to eat a healthy diet with a variety of foods. Although there is no specific recommended daily allowance for sodium in children, unlike the adult RDA of 2,400mg of sodium a day, a typical salt intake for kids would usually be up to about:

1000-1500mg for children 2-3 years of age
1200-1900mg for children 4-8 years of age
1500-2200mg for children 9-13 years of age
1500-2300mg for children 14-18 years of age
In general, if you simply don’t add extra salt to the foods you prepare and your child eats and avoid a lot of the foods high in salt, then you shouldn’t have to worry about your child’s salt intake.

Keep in mind that like adults, kids can develop a taste or preference for salty foods. That makes it important to avoid salty foods and not add extra salt to foods when your child first begins solids as an infant and toddler.

And if you are concerned about your child’s salt intake, especially if he is overweight, then look for more foods that are low in salt, with less than 140mg of salt per serving.

Salt vs. Sodium

Although people often use the words salt and sodium interchangeably, they are different. Salt is actually made up of sodium chloride (NaCl).

One teaspoon of salt (3g) equals about 1200mg of sodium, and it is the mg of sodium that you will see on a food’s nutrition label.

Sources:

High salt intake, its origins, its economic impact, and its effect on blood pressure. Roberts WC – Am J Cardiol – 1-DEC-2001; 88(11): 1338-46.

IOM 2004 Dietary Reference Intakes: Electrolytes and Water.

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 18. Sodium, Na (mg) Content of Selected Foods per Common Measure, sorted by nutrient content.

Salt Intake Is Related to Soft Drink Consumption in Children and Adolescents: A Link to Obesity? Feng J. He, Naomi M. Marrero, and Graham A. MacGregor. Hypertension. 2008;51:629-634.

http://pediatrics.about.com/od/nutrition/a/0208_foods_salt.htm