Archive for food & beverages

Wisdom on Drinking

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 5, 2013 by ecofrenfood

Wisdom on Drinking

Drunk Taster 
 
In an alcohol factory the regular taster died and the director was in urgent need of looking for a replacement.
 
A drunkard with ragged, dirty look came to apply for the position.

The director of the factory wondered how to send him away. They tested him.

They gave him a glass with a drink.
 
He tried it and said, “It’s red wine, a Muscat, three years old, grown on a north slope, matured in steel containers.”
 
“That’s correct”, said the boss.

Another glass.
 
“It is red wine, cabernet, eight years old, a south-western slope, oak barrels.”
 
“Correct.”

A third glass. 
 
”It’s champagne, high grade and exclusive” calmly said the drunk.

The director was astonished. 
 
He winked at his secretary to suggest something.

She brought in a glass of urine. The alcoholic tried it.

“It’s a blonde, 26 years old, pregnant in the third month. 
And if you don’t give me the job, I’ll name the father!” 
 
    

 
 
THIS WISDOM IS VALUABLE!

 
To my friends who enjoy a glass of wine...
And those who don’t.

As Ben Franklin said:
In wine there is wisdom,
In beer there is freedom,
In water there are bacteria.

In a number of carefully controlled trials,
Scientists have demonstrated that if we drink
1 litre of water each day,
At the end of the year we would have absorbed
More than 1 kilo of Escherichia coli, (E. Coli) – bacteria
Found in faeces.
In other words, we are consuming 1 kilo of poop.

However, we do NOT run that risk when drinking
wine & beer or tequila, rum, whiskey or other liquor
Because alcohol has to go through a purification

process of boiling, filtering and/or fermenting.

Remember:
Water = Poop,
Wine = Health
.
Therefore, it’s better to drink wine and talk stupid,

Than to drink water and be full of shit
.

There is no need to thank me for this valuable information:
I’m doing it as a public service!

wow interesting FOOD FACTs

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 27, 2012 by ecofrenfood

” Health Benefits of Consuming Dates ”

1) Dates are free from cholesterol and contain very low fat. Dates are rich in vitamins and minerals.

2) They are rich source of protein, dietary fiber and rich in vitamin B1, B2, B3 and B5 along with vitamin A1 and C.

3)It helps improve the digestive system as it contains soluble and insoluble fibers and different kinds of amino acids.

4) Dates are great energy boosters as they contain natural sugars like glucose, sucrose and fructose. To get more advantage add dates to milk and make it a very nutritious snack.

5)Dates are very low in calories and are extremely suitable for health conscious people.

6) Dates are rich in potassium and reduced in sodium. This helps regulate a healthy nervous system. Researchers have revealed the fact that potassium intake up to a certain extent can reduce risk of stroke.

7) Dates also help in lowering of the LDL cholesterol.

8) Dates have high iron content and are very useful in treating anemia. The patients can eat many dates for better advantages.

9) Dates also have fluorine that slows down the process of tooth decay.

10) It helps people suffering from constipation. Soak dates overnight and take it along with water to have added advantage.

11) Dates help in weight gain and are beneficial for those who suffer from over slimming problem.

12) Dates are excellent for alcoholic intoxication.Cures abdominal cancer.

13) It also helps in improving eye sight and helps in curing night blindness as well.

“The best thing is that it does not have any side effect on the body and is completely natural as well as it works better than medicine.”

Top 10 Foods Highest in Selenium

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 28, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Top 10 Foods Highest in Selenium

#1: Nuts (Brazil Nuts)
Nuts, especially Brazil nuts, are a great source of selenium. Brazil nuts, which are also rich in magnesium, provide the most selenium with 1917μg (2739% DV) per 100 gram serving, 2550μg (3642% DV) per cup, and 96μg (137% DV) in a single kernel or nut. Mixed nuts by contrast provide about half as much selenium with 422μg (77% DV) per 100 gram serving, 607μg (111% DV) per cup, and 118μg (169% DV) per ounce.

#2: Shellfish (Oysters, Mussels, Whelk)
In addition to selenium oysters and shellfish are also a great source of iron, zinc, copper, and vitamin B12. Pacific oysters provide the most selenium with 154μg (220% DV) per 100 gram serving, or 131μg (52% DV) per ounce, and 38.5μg (55% DV) per oyster. Other shellfish high in selenium include blue mussels and whelk which provide 90μg (128% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, 76μg (109% DV) per 3 ounce serving.

#3: Liver
The liver of most any animal is packed with nutrients like selenium. Often appearing on the culinary scene as pâté, liver can also be eaten in sausage (liverwurst), and prepared steamed or fried with onions and herbs. Lamb liver provides the most selenium with 116μg per 100g serving or 166% of the DV. That is 99μg (141% DV) of selenium in a 3 ounce serving.

#4: Fish
Fish is a heart healthy food, a good source of protein, and rich in vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, and B12. Orange roughy provides the most selenium with 88μg (126% DV) per 100 gram serving, 75μg (107% DV) per 3 ounce serving. It is followed by canned tuna, canned anchovies, swordfish, pickled herring, and lastly tilefish which provides 52μg (74% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, or 44μg (63% DV) per 3 ounce serving.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#5: Sunflower Seeds
Sunflower seeds are great as a snack or as an addition to salads, they are also a great source of vitamin E, iron, vitamin B1 (thiamin), B6, protein, magnesium, potassium, and copper. Sunflower seeds provide 79μg (113% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, that is 102μg (145% DV) of selenium per cup hulled, and 22.2μg (32% DV) per ounce.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#6: Bran (Wheat, Rice, and Oat)
Rice, Wheat, and Oat bran are great additions to breads and breakfast cereals like oats, rye, and buckwheat.
Wheat bran contains 78μg (111% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, which is 45μg (64% DV) per cup, and 3μg (4% DV) per tablespoon. Oat bran provides 45μg (65% DV) of selenium per 100 grams, and rice bran contains much less selenium with 17μg per 100 gram serving.

#7: Caviar
Caviar is not as expensive as people think and is a great source of iron, protein, and vitamin B12. 100 grams of caviar will provide 65.5μg (94% DV) of selenium, or 18μg (26% DV) per ounce, 10.5μg (15% DV) per tablespoon.

#8: Bacon and Pork Chops
Despite being a high cholesterol food bacon is a good source of selenium. 100 grams of bacon will provide 65μg (93% DV) of selenium, or 5μg (7% DV) per slice. Lean pork chops provide 43μg (61% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, 31μg (44% DV) per chop.

#9: Lobster and Crab
Lobster is most commonly served baked, steamed, or in bisque. A 100g serving of spiny lobster provides 59.2μg (85% DV) of selenium, that is 96.5μg (138%DV) in a whole lobster, 50.3μg (72% DV) in a 3 ounce serving. Dungeness crab provides 47.6μg (68% DV) per 100 gram serving, 60.5μg (86% DV) per crab, and 40.5μg (58% DV) per 3 ounce serving. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#10: Shrimp (Prawns, Camarones)
Despite being a high cholesterol food shrimps are rich in iron as well as selenium. Shrimps provide 39.6μg (57% DV) of selenium per 100 gram serving, 34μg (48% DV) per 3 ounce serving, and 8.7μg (12% DV) of selenium in 4 large shrimps.

$1 The Value of a Dollar

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 16, 2012 by ecofrenfood

When Jonathan Blaustein purchased 10 early-season organic blueberries for $1, he was a little upset by this price, because six weeks earlier he had purchased 17 organic blueberries from Chile for the same amount of money. And those blueberries from Chile were from 800 miles away but were half the cost of California berries.

Eventually, after seeing many different menus around the world with various dollar-priced meals, photographer Mr. Blaustein, 36, decided to pursue a project “The Value of a Dollar”.

So, what food can you buy if you only have $1 in your wallet? See these photos taken by Mr. Blaustein and find out the answer.


Shurfine flour


A double cheeseburger from McDonald’s


Organic grapefruit from a natural food store


Conventional grapefruit


Tomatillos from Mexico


Candy necklaces from China


Shufrine white bread


Potted meat food product


Organic basmati rice


Tea biscuits from Spain


Shrimp-flavored ramen noodles


Beef shank


Pork floss, or rousong


Fenugreek seeds from India


Saffron


Side salad with ranch dressing from Burger King


Escargot in a can from Indonesia


Early-season organic blueberries from California


Dried smelt

Steamed Clams in Garlic Beer Sauce

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Steamed Clams in Garlic Beer Sauce
From Chef Martin Yan

Garlic, shallots, green chile, black bean sauce and Tsingtao Pure Draft create a rich flavorful sauce in this recipe for steamed clams from chef Martin Yan.
Ingredients:

* 2 tablespoons butter
* 2 teaspoons minced garlic
* 1 shallot, minced
* 1 green chile, thinly sliced
* 1 cup Tsingtao Pure Draft beer
* 3 tablespoons black bean sauce
* 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
* 1 teaspoon sugar
* 2 pounds clams, scrubbed
* 1 teaspoon minced cilantro

Preparation:
Instructions:

1. Heat a stir-fry pan or deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the butter, swirling until melted. Add the garlic, shallot, and chile and cook until fragrant, about 10 seconds. Add the beer, black bean sauce, vinegar, and sugar and boil until liquid is reduced by half about 5 minutes. Add the clams, cover and let cook until clam shells open, 5-7 minutes.

2. Transfer to a serving dish (discard any clams whose shells have not opened) and garnish with the cilantro.

Steamed Clams With Garlic Beer Sauce recipe created by Chef Martin Yan.
http://chinesefood.about.com/od/seafoodrecipes/r/steamed-clams.htm

Almond, Pine Nut, Apricot Crumb Cake

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Almond, Pine Nut, Apricot Crumb Cake

Recipe courtesy Giada De Laurentiis

Ingredients

* 1/2 cup whole almonds, toasted, plus 1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
* 1/4 cup pine nuts, toasted, plus 1/4 cup
* 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
* 1 teaspoon baking powder
* 1/2 teaspoon salt
* 4 large eggs
* 1 1/4 cups sugar
* 1 1/2 sticks butter, melted
* 1/3 cup milk
* 1/4 teaspoon almond extract
* 1/2 cup chopped dried apricots

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Butter and flour a 9-inch cake pan.

Combine the whole almonds and 1/4 cup pine nuts in a food processor. Pulse the machine until the nuts are finely ground. Transfer the nuts to a medium bowl. Add the flour, baking powder, and salt. Stir to combine and set aside.

In a medium bowl, using an electric mixer beat the eggs and the sugar until the mixture becomes thick and pale yellow. Add the butter, and milk. Stir in the almond extract and apricots. Gently stir in the dry ingredients. Pour the batter into the prepared cake pan. Sprinkle the top of the cake with sliced almonds and remaining 1/4 cup pine nuts. Bake until the cake is cooked and a toothpick comes out clean, about 50 to 55 minutes. Let the cake cool on a wire rack. Use a knife to loosen the edges. Turn the cake out, slice, and serve.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/everyday-italian/almond-pine-nut-apricot-crumb-cake-recipe/index.html

Babies Dressed As Food

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Babies Dressed As Food


http://www.buzzfeed.com/gavon/20-photos-of-babies-dressed-as-food

Bad habit

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2012 by ecofrenfood

BAD HABITS (Don’t, Don’t, Don’t , DON’T!!!)
For goodness sake don’t eat your nails
They’re made from glue and bits of snails
So if you chew and bite them back
You’ll grow a shell upon your back!

For goodness sake don’t hold your breath
It’s something that can make you deaf
For if your ears fill up with air
You’ll never hear again, I swear!

For goodness sake don’t scratch your bum
‘Cause (I was told this by my mum)
If you should scratch yours every day
You’ll end up scratching it away!

For goodness sake don’t pick your nose,
From this would come the worst of woes,
If you commit this dreadful sin,
Eventually your face caves in!

George Ansell

The Worst Foods for Your Eyes

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2012 by ecofrenfood

The Worst Foods for Your Eyes
Written by Kristy White

One of the keys to improving eyesight naturally is maintaining well-balanced diet. Essentially, this means that you need to eat a variety of products from all food categories in order to supply your eyes with all the nutrients they need.

It is likely that the majority of the food products you consume are not harmful for your eyes. However, the way you prepare them and your eating habits can turn them into the worst foods for your eyes.

It would be too much to say that something is totally bad for your vision however there are many food products that may have negative impact on your vision or speed up the progression of some common eye disorders. Here are some of the worst foods for your eyes that you need to avoid.

Junk food. Candies, chips, cookies, even some nuts can have a detrimental effect on eyes. According to Good Morning America recent news, a new study suggests that “Vegetable, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, along with linoleic acid are the type of fats that put junk food enthusiasts at a higher risk for the eye disease”. Not only the fats contained in junk food are bad for your eyes, but the abundant amounts of sugar or salt many snacks contain. Salt and sugar are notorious for their negative impact on vision.

Margarine. Many consider margarine a healthier choice to butter because of its plant origin. The truth is that margarine, along with other commonly used hydrogenated oils such as peanut butter and soybean oil, is potentially bad for your eyes. Hydrogenation is an industrial method for turning liquid vegetable oils into solid ones. During the process of hydrogenation vegetable fat molecules not only lose almost all of their beneficial vitamins and minerals but are transformed into trans-fats. Trans-fats are extremely dangerous for your overall health and for your eye health in particular.

Deep fried foods. If you want to enjoy 20/20 vision for longer, forget about deep-fried foods. Not only prolonged heating of the oil changes its structure and makes it bad for your eyes but most of the foods simply loose their nutritional value when deep-fried. By eating too much deep fried foods, you increase the amounts of free-radicals in your body (they damage the eye cells and lead to various eye disorders plus speed up the natural processes of aging) and decrease the amounts of the nutrients that can fight those free-radicals. For instance, sweet potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin C – a well known free radical scavenger. However, by frying them, you turn them into one of the worst foods for your eyes because frying destroys nearly all vitamin C content and saturates them with harmful trans-fats from the frying oils.

High sugary foods. “Eating lots of sugary, starchy foods may make eyes more vulnerable to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), America’s top cause of vision loss.” reports WebMD. Any food item that causes your blood sugar to rise rapidly, for instance chocolate, puts the most important part of your eye – the retina, at risk. You can still indulge a sweet bite from time to time but chose carbohydrates that don’t make your blood sugar spike quickly.

Homemade Tortilla Chips

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on February 12, 2012 by ecofrenfood

10 tortillas (white or yellow flour OR corn)
vegetable oil cooking spray
popcorn salt (optional)

Directions:

1
Preheat the oven to 350 or 375.
2
Lay the tortillas on the counter top, side by side, very close together.
3
Spray ’tillas generously with the oil spritzer; sprinkle with optional salt.
4
If using the pizza cutter AND in a hurry, stack ’tillas in piles of 3 or 5 and slice up quickly into triangles (make five to six cuts to get uniform sizes).
5
If using cookie cutters, don’t pile up the tortillas–it’s too thick and aggravating!
6
Lay the “chips” on the cookie sheets and pop them into the oven—bake ONLY until a very light brown.
7
Cool slightly and THEN–dive in!
8
You might as well double the recipe, because you’re going to wish you did as soon as you take your first bite!

Read more: http://low-cholesterol.food.com/recipe/oh-so-good-homemade-tortilla-chips-260763#ixzz1m8hIvQsN