Archive for fish

Foods that can eliminate bad breath

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 19, 2013 by ecofrenfood

Foods that can eliminate bad breath

Tuesday, January 15th 2013.

Eliminate bad breath

 

Foods that can eliminate bad breath | dmatxi.com. Although often overlooked, mouth and teeth uncared can lead to a bad breath or halitosis. Collection of bad bacteria in the mouth that interact with the remnants of food will produce odors. If you want practical, brush your teeth after breakfast and before bed. Use a toothpaste that has been packed full with natural extracts, such as lime, betel leaves, and salt, which would protect oral health. Plus, create a longer lasting fresh breath.

 

People who have problems of bad breath (halitosis) is generally not aware of any problems. Actually there is an easy way to test the breath smell. Press a clean finger into the mouth and then wipe the saliva in the back of the tongue. Allow a few moments and then smell your finger.

 

eliminate bad breath, causes bad breath, reduce bad breath

 

Causes of bad breath

 

  • Bacteria; The mouth is one part of the body that liked by bacteria. These microorganisms lurking in between the teeth and tongue surface. When the bacteria multiply and accumulate toxins and they will issue a less pleasant odor.
  • Tonsils; Holes on the inside of the tonsils (tonsillectomy) is called crypts, is one culprit of halitosis. The dots on lymphoid tissue in the swollen tonsils often tucked away leftovers and bacteria that cause bad odors.
  • Foods; Foods such as garlic, durian, or fish, also cause bad breath, even though we have to brush your teeth.
  • Disease; Bad breath can also be a sign of diseases such as respiratory infections, chronic sinus infections, diabetes, kidney disorders, liver, and chronic acid reflux.
  • Dry mouth; Lack of drinking water and a dry mouth is also a contributor to the cause of bad breath problem. That’s why, when wake up in the morning bad breath. This smell usually goes away after you brush your teeth and drink water.

 

Foods reduce and eliminate of bad breath

 

  • Lemon; Try to suck the lemon slices, or biting edge of the lemon. If you are in restaurants, can order water with lemon in it, or lemon tea. For the times of urgency, with candy lemon-flavored can also help, plus more portable.
  • Apples, pears, and carrots; These foods are rich in fiber, plus chewing these foods will help mouth produce saliva. Both of these will create a kind of cleansing the mouth.
  • Crispy seasoning; For more exotic solutions, try searching for cardamom, coriander, or fennel seeds, commonly sold in places where the sale of spices. Chewing spices were going to remove the oil to neutralize bad breath.
  • Leaves of mint or cinnamon sticks; These materials can help neutralize the unpleasant odor of onions and garlic. Plus, oil of cinnamon can kill bacteria in the mouth so as not to grow more. Cinnamon or mint gum as effective. If you are lovers of chewing gum, choose a sense of mint chewing gum containing xylitol to reduce the risk of cavities and refreshes the breath.
  • Berry fruit and yogurt; If you can not get through the day without eating foods that can trigger bad breath smell, eat for prevention, which is better than trying to eliminate the smell that was overpowering. Eating half a cup of plain yogurt, sugar free, low in fat and can reduce levels of hydrogen sulfide odors that cause bad breath. Berries, as well as melons, oranges and other fruits that contain vitamin C, also can reduce oral bacteria that smell. Start each day with a fruit yogurt provided as a complement.

Bad breath can be triggered by various factors, one is from foods. Food can not only cause bad breath, but also can help eliminate the odor. Bad breath or halitosis, is caused by various reasons such as eating certain foods, smoking, gum disease, dry mouth and oral bacteria.

http://dmatxi.com/15/foods-that-can-eliminate-bad-breath.html

$1 The Value of a Dollar

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 16, 2012 by ecofrenfood

When Jonathan Blaustein purchased 10 early-season organic blueberries for $1, he was a little upset by this price, because six weeks earlier he had purchased 17 organic blueberries from Chile for the same amount of money. And those blueberries from Chile were from 800 miles away but were half the cost of California berries.

Eventually, after seeing many different menus around the world with various dollar-priced meals, photographer Mr. Blaustein, 36, decided to pursue a project “The Value of a Dollar”.

So, what food can you buy if you only have $1 in your wallet? See these photos taken by Mr. Blaustein and find out the answer.


Shurfine flour


A double cheeseburger from McDonald’s


Organic grapefruit from a natural food store


Conventional grapefruit


Tomatillos from Mexico


Candy necklaces from China


Shufrine white bread


Potted meat food product


Organic basmati rice


Tea biscuits from Spain


Shrimp-flavored ramen noodles


Beef shank


Pork floss, or rousong


Fenugreek seeds from India


Saffron


Side salad with ranch dressing from Burger King


Escargot in a can from Indonesia


Early-season organic blueberries from California


Dried smelt

Meet your meat, why you should become vegetarian

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 1, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Meet your meat, why you should become vegetarian

Dog meat restaurant

Cooking Dog on the BBQ

Speed Cooking- serving live snake and fish

Frogs in Hong Kong

Japanese cuisine

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 23, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Japanese cuisine has been influenced by the food customs of other nations, but has adopted and refined them to create its own unique cooking style and eating habits.

The first foreign influence on Japan was China around 300 B.C. , when the Japanese learned to cultivate rice. The use of chopsticks and the consumption of soy sauce and soybean curd (tofu) also came from China.

The Buddhist religion, one of the two major religions in Japan today (the other is
Shintoism), was another important influence on the Japanese diet. In the A.D. 700s, the rise of Buddhism led to a ban on eating meat. The popular dish, sushi (raw fish with rice) came about as a result of this ban. In the 1800s, cooking styles became simpler. A wide variety of vegetarian (meatless) foods were served in small portions, using one of five standard cooking techniques. All foods were divided into five color groups (green, red, yellow, white, and black-purple) and six tastes (bitter, sour, sweet, hot, salty, and delicate). The Japanese continue to use this cooking system.

Beginning in the early 1200s, trade with other countries began bringing Western-style influences to Japan. The Dutch introduced corn, potatoes, and sweet potatoes. The Portuguese introduced tempura (batter frying).

After a ban of more than one thousand years, beef returned to Japan during the Meiji Period (1868–1912). Western foods, such as bread, coffee, and ice cream, become popular during the late twentieth century. Another Western influence has been the introduction of timesaving cooking methods. These include the electric rice cooker, packaged foods such as instant noodles, instant miso (fermented soybean paste) soup, and instant pickling mixes. However, the Japanese are still devoted to their classic cooking traditions.

FOODS OF THE JAPANESE
Rice and noodles are the two primary staples of the Japanese diet. Rice, either boiled or steamed, is served at every meal. Noodles come in many varieties. Among the most popular are soba, thin brown noodles made from buckwheat flour; udon, thick white noodles made from wheat flour; and ramen, thin, curly noodles, also made from wheat flour . Soy sauce and other soybean products are also staples in Japan. These include miso (fermented soybean paste) and tofu (a soybean curd that resembles custard). Other common ingredients in Japanese food include bamboo shoots, daikon (a giant white radish), ginger, seaweed, and sesame seed products. Japanese pickles called tsukemono are served at every meal. Seafood is also plentiful in this island nation. Green tea is the national beverage of Japan, although black tea is also available. Sake (SAH-kee, wine made from rice, usually served warm) and beer are also very popular.

Two uniquely Japanese foods are sushi (fresh raw seafood with rice) and sashimi (fresh raw seafood with soy sauce); both rely on freshly caught fish or seafood. Dishes prepared in a single pot ( nabemeno ) are popular throughout Japan. Sukiyaki is a dish made up of paper-thin slices of beef (or sometimes chicken), vegetables, and cubes of tofu cooked in broth. Shabu-shabu is beef and vegetables, also cooked in broth but then dipped in flavorful sauces. Each region has its own selection of favorite foods. People living on the cold northern island of Hokkaido enjoy potatoes, corn, and barbecued meats. Foods in western Japan tend to be more delicately flavored than those in the east.

The Japanese are known for using very fresh ingredients in their cooking. They prefer using fresh, seasonal foods for their meals, buying it the same day it will be cooked. The Japanese are also famous for their skill in arranging food so that it looks beautiful. The people of Japan live long lives and have a low rate of heart disease because of healthy eating habits.

FOOD FOR RELIGIOUS AND HOLIDAY CELEBRATIONS
The most important holiday in Japan is the New Year, Shogatsu. Special holiday foods, called osechi , are prepared in beautifully decorated stackable boxes called jubako. Each layer of the box has compartments for several different foods. Glazed sardines, bamboo shoots, sweet black beans, and chestnuts in sweet potato paste are just a few of the many holiday foods. New Year foods are also eaten because they are believed to represent good fortune or long life. At New Year’s, children are especially fond of hot rice cakes dipped in sweet soybean powder.

The Girls’ Festival (or Doll Festival) is held in March. Dolls are dressed in traditional Japanese dresses called kimonos and are offered rice crackers, colored rice cakes, and a sweet rice drink called amazake . Everyone in the family eats the foods. Festive foods for Children’s Day (May 5) include rice dumplings stuffed with sweet bean paste.

The tea ceremony ( cha-no-yu ) is an important Japanese ritual that can be held on a holiday or other special occasion. Developed over several centuries, it plays an important role in Japanese life and culture.

MEALTIME CUSTOMS
The Japanese eat three main meals a day. The main ingredient in all three, however, is rice (or sometimes noodles). Miso soup and pickles are always served as well. Meals eaten early in the day tend to be the simplest. A typical breakfast consists of rice, miso soup, and a side dish, such as an egg or grilled fish.

Noodles are very popular for lunch (and as a snack), and a restaurant or take-out stand referred to as a noodle house is a popular spot for lunch. A typical lunch would be a bowl of broth with vegetables, seaweed, or fish. The bento is a traditional box lunch packed in a small, flat box with dividers. It includes small portions of rice, meat, fish, and vegetables. Stores sell ready-made bento for take out and some even have Western-style ingredients like spaghetti or sausages. A favorite among young people, and as a take-out food, is a stuffed rice ball called onigiri.

Many Japanese have turned to Western-style food for breakfast and lunch, especially in the cities. However, traditional dinners are still eaten by most people in Japan, such as rice, soup, pickles, and fish. Seasonal fresh fruit makes a great dessert. Sweets are more likely to be served with green tea in the afternoon.

Food is grasped between chopsticks and lifted to one’s mouth. Chopsticks should never be stuck into a piece of food or used to pass food back and forth. It is not considered impolite to sip one’s soup directly from the bowl. At a Japanese meal, people at the table fill each other’s drinking glasses but never their own.

The Japanese do not eat while they are doing other things, such as walking or driving. A Japanese car company once claimed that some of its seatbelts didn’t work properly in the United States because Americans spilled so much food in their cars. They believe people should not eat and drive cars at the same time.

POLITICS, ECONOMICS, AND NUTRITION
Because Japanese people like to eat a lot of fish, one of the major issues facing the Japanese government relates to fishing privileges. For example, Japan, Canada, and the United States have argued over the rights to fish for salmon. Japan has had conflicts with neighboring Asian nations, including the Republic of Korea, China, Indonesia, and Australia, over fishing rights to waters around those countries.

More than 80 countries, including the United States, have adopted laws that restrict other countries from fishing within 200 miles of their coastlines. This has resulted in Japan being forced to pay fees for the privilege of fishing in many ocean areas around the world.

http://www.foodbycountry.com/Germany-to-Japan/Japan.html#ixzz1SuCo0hNV

The Best Fish to Eat (and the Most Dangerous)

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 22, 2011 by ecofrenfood

The Best Fish to Eat (and the Most Dangerous)
By: Celeste Perron
May 18, 2011

We all hear, ad nauseum, that fish should play a big role in a healthy diet. They’re a good source of protein, are packed with essential fatty acids, provide a range of vitamins and minerals, and are low in “bad” fats (true regardless of whether you consider saturated fat or omega-6-laden vegetable oils to be the enemy).

And now that summer is almost upon us, I’m dreaming of fish tacos — though fish is a good idea all year, I tend to crave it most when the weather is warm. But the issue of which fish to eat seems to grow more complicated by the day. Many varieties of fish are being hunted to extinction, fish farms are hurting the oceans, many fish are contaminated with heavy metals and toxins like PCBs, and now we’ve got radiation from Japan in the water.

To help an eager pescavore sort out how to eat healthily and sustainably, I’ve tried to answer some of the most pressing questions:

What’s the healthiest fish to eat?

Although all fish offer some health benefits, salmon seems to take the superfood prize. It’s loaded with the omega-3s DHA and EPA, which boost cardiovascular health, improve mood and brain function, protect your joints, prevent macular degeneration and may help prevent cancer.

But, beware: About 80% of salmon in your supermarket is farmed, and farmed salmon, while cheaper, could do you more harm than good. A blog post by Mark Sisson explains why farmed salmon is a bad deal—fewer omega-3s plus a hefty dose of PCBs and other contaminants, plus red food dye (since farmed salmon is fed an unnatural diet, the flesh would be grey if not dyed a rosy hue).

Your best bet is wild, Alaskan salmon. Yes, it costs more, but if you can’t afford big fillets try buying smaller portions and putting it in omelets, pasta or tacos.

What are the safest and most eco options?

In general, fish that are low on the food chain—think sardines, anchovies and shellfish—are the least contaminated with toxins. Some other relatively safe and earth-friendly choices: Alaskan and California halibut, Alaskan salmon, Mackerel, California squid, Dungeness crab, and farmed shellfish. (This is according to a good fish/bad fish list put together for San Francisco magazine by Kenny Belov, an owner of Sausalito, CA restaurant Fish, one of my favorite places to eat.)

What about tuna?

Tuna is tricky—it’s packed with healthy fats but usually also packed with mercury (a potent neurotoxin that can build up in our bodies). Plus, in part because the past couple of decades have seen an explosion in sushi consumption, tuna are being stripped from the oceans at an unsustainable rate. So because of both health and ethical reasons, I try to avoid it.

If you do eat tuna, it seems that the best choices are Pacific albacore and US Yellowfin (if they are troll- or line-caught).

Which other fish should I avoid?

It’s a long list, unfortunately. See it on the Seafood Watch website and download one of their seafood guides—they have printable wallet guides as well as Iphone and Android apps, and do guides specific to various regions of the country. I have the guide on my Iphone and find it really helpful when I’m trying to make sense of the seafood counter.

Should I worry about radiation?

Probably not—that’s the consensus anyway, though of course there are dissenters. (This Mother Jones article explains.) I heard Andrew Weil speak at an event last week, and when somebody asked him about radiation dangers he said that the radiation seemed to not be affecting Alaskan waters, so at least we can eat fish from the far north without fear.

http://health.lifegoesstrong.com/best-fish-eat-and-most-dangerous?utm_source=OB_health&obref=obnetwork

Plaintiff Foods Hair Loss

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Plaintiff Foods Hair Loss

Thinning hair is a horrible thing for women. Not only have external treatment, food intake is also important guarded. If you start to see hair loss, hair piled on the floor, pillow, or a water hole in the bathroom, you should start trying mengasup foods that strengthen and protect your scalp. Here are a few:

Fish, eggs, and nuts
The main content of hair is protein. Therefore, try eating protein will be helpful for healthy hair. However, that does not mean you can eat high protein foods as they please regardless of other content. Steak, for example, is rich in protein, but also high in fat. High fat will increase testosterone levels. This is believed to cause hair loss. So, the steak is food that should be avoided for no more hair loss. Pick enough protein foods, like fish-ikanan (which also has other content that are good for the body), chicken, veal liver, low-fat cheese, eggs, almonds, seeds, and yogurt. Soy milk and tofu is also a good food additive because it is rich in protein and low in bad fats.

Raisins
Iron plays an important role in producing hemoglobin, the part of blood that carries oxygen to all organs and tissues. When hemoglobin is in a healthy level, oxygen is distributed properly. This means you get your scalp healthy blood flow and will stimulate and build healthy hair. Adding iron in the diet does not mean you should eat liver every day. You can add sweet foods, such as raisins and cherry juice, rich in iron.

Eggs, dates, raisins, dark green leafy vegetables, whole grains and cereals are also rich in iron. Vitamin C helps iron absorption, which can be obtained from oranges, strawberries, and lemon.

Bean sprouts
Our bodies use a substance called silica (not silica gel for absorbing moisture in the bag) to absorb vitamins and minerals. If the body lacks silica, vitamin every day that you enter will not be useful. Silica can be obtained from the bean sprouts, cucumber skin, red and green peppers, and potatoes.

Posted by Smart & Solutions

The most humane method to boil lobster

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 18, 2010 by ecofrenfood

Grilling lobster
Follow the instructions for boiling a lobster above, but only par-boil the lobster for about 5 minutes.
Remove the lobster from the pot and place it on its back.
Preheat the grill to a medium – hot heat.
Take a sharp knife and cut the lobster down the middle. Remove the black vein that runs down the tail, the green tomalley and the sand sac, which is located in the head area, behind the eyes.
Baste the lobster meat with melted butter and lemon juice (optional) and place under the preheated grill, shell-side down for around 8 – 10 minutes or until the lobster meat is thoroughly cooked.
Serve immediately.
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Steaming lobster

You will require a longer cooking time to steam your lobster, however, many people say that the result is even better than boiling, giving you a succulent and tasty lobster meat.
Place a steaming rack to hold the lobster in the bottom of a large pot.
Pour 2 inches of water into the pot and add 1 tablespoon of sea salt.
Cover the pot with the lid and bring the water to the boil.
Once the water is boiling fiercely, place the lobster onto the rack, cover the pot and bring back to the boil.
Begin timing once the water is boiling again.
Steam the lobster for 14 minutes for the first lb of weight and then an extra 3 minutes for each extra lb. A 2 lb lobster will cook in 17 minutes, a 3 lb in 20 minutes.
Once the lobster is done, drain immediately and serve.
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Boiling lobster

In order to boil your lobster, you will need a large pot with a lid.
Pour enough water in the pot to cover the lobster completely.
Add 2 tablespoons of sea salt for every 2 litres (4 pints) of water.
Bring the water to a fierce boil.
Grasp the live lobster behind the claws and drop it headfirst into the boiling water.
Cover the pot and once the water has started to boil again, start timing.
Boil the lobster for 10 minutes for the first lb of weight and then 3 more minutes for each extra pound. A two lb lobster will be done in 13 minutes, a 3 lb lobster in 16 minutes.
Once cooked, drain the lobster immediately and serve hot.
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The most humane method
A lot of people consider boiling a lobster alive to be inhumane and cruel. Other people believe that the nervous system of a lobster is too simple for it to feel any pain at all, similar to insects. This subject remains a topic of controversy, still to this day.

Studies have been carried out by a number of researchers and universities to determine the most humane method of boiling lobster.

Various methods of relaxation techniques were carried out prior to boiling and the lowest number of tail flicks upon insertion into the boiling water was thought to mean that the lobster felt less pain.

It was found that the best way to minimize the tail movements of the lobster upon boiling is by placing the lobster in the freezer for a period of 5 – 10 minutes in order to numb the lobster before cooking.

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Lobster must be cooked in salty water, so that the flavour of the meat is maintained, and sea water is preferred if available. Do not panic if sea water is not an option for you, as salted tap water will be fine.

You may add a mixture of wine, vegetables and herbs to the water in order to give the lobster meat more flavour. The residual liquid may also be used to make a delicious stock or sauce. Ingredients that can be added include white wine, pepper, parsley, celery, onions, carrots, or bay leaves.

Many lobster lovers say that lobster is best eaten whole and steamed. However, you can also cook your lobster and use the meat to make sandwiches, salads, soups, risottos and a large number of other varied dishes.
http://www.helpwithcooking.com/seafood-shellfish/how-to-cook-lobster.html