Archive for ecofrenhealth

Food Craze? Mexican Cookies Made With Grasshopper Powder

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2014 by ecofrenfood

Food Craze? Mexican Cookies Made With Grasshopper Powder

Insects and arachnids are popular snack foods in China, Thailand and other Asian countries. Grasshoppers are also important in Mexican cuisine, although the insects are much smaller than those enjoyed in Thailand. Their stratospheric protein content makes grasshoppers (or “chapulines”) a healthy snack popular with all age groups.

How Are Grasshoppers Used in Mexican Cuisine?

Grasshoppers are a popular Mexican snack food because they are inexpensive, have a mild flavor, light texture and a high protein content. Snackers prefer to eat small, whole grasshoppers in large quantities, seasoned with salt, pepper and chili powder. Crispy, fried “chapulines” occupy a place in Mexican snacking culture akin to popcorn in America. Huge platters of tiny red grasshoppers are popular in tapas restaurants and are also eaten as bar food.

What Is Grasshopper Powder?

Powdered grasshopper is a condiment made from seasoned, cooked, pulverized insects. The powder is a popular at restaurants, where diners sprinkle it over soups, tacos, enchiladas and other dishes. Unflavored grasshopper powder also adds an extra protein boost to sweet dishes.

What Are Powdered Grasshopper Cookies?

Powdered grasshopper cookies are high in protein, low in fat and have the same appeal as traditional cookies made with eggs and butter. They have a delicious flavor and hearty, chewy texture. The most popular flavors of these “secret grasshopper food” cookies are oatmeal and oatmeal raisin.

Why Are Whole Grasshoppers Not Used in Cookies?

Powdering grasshoppers before adding them to cookie batter makes it impossible to tell that the cookies contain insects. Grasshoppers are very popular in southern Mexico, where poverty is a severe problem. Many northern Mexicans refuse to eat the whole “chapulines” because they do not rely on the insects for dietary protein. Powdering the grasshoppers substantially increases the market potential of commercial cookie brands and increases the viability of “secret grasshopper food” cookies in northern Mexican public schools.

Are Grasshopper Powder Cookies Related to the Minty Treats Called Grasshopper Cookies?

Grasshopper powder cookies are not related to the popular “grasshopper cookies” made with chocolate and mint. The green “grasshopper powder” sold at American gourmet boutiques is a sweet dessert sprinkle made from mint and white chocolate. The powder is delicious in cookies, shakes and frozen desserts, but it is unrelated to the protein-rich Mexican insect powder.

Although grasshoppers are most popular as a savory snack food, their nutritional profile also makes them an attractive addition to baked goods. Powdering the cooked insects makes them indistinguishable from plant-based baking ingredients such as powdered cinnamon and whole wheat flour, which also have a reddish appearance. This is a necessary step that makes powdered grasshopper cookies universally palatable.

http://recipes.answers.com/article/879409/food-craze-mexican-cookies-made-with-grasshopper-powder

Taiwan Reels From Gutter Oil Scandal

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2014 by ecofrenfood

Taiwan Reels From Gutter Oil Scandal

Newly reformulated 10-calorie sodas leave fructose levels a mystery

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 24, 2013 by ecofrenfood

 

Newly reformulated 10-calorie sodas leave fructose levels a mystery

Posted by — May 16, 2013

Are you an ‘ex-Pepper’? If so, The Dr. Pepper/Snapple Group hopes to bring you back into the fold.  In an effort to lure what it refers to as “consumers who have left the soft drink category” the company is working feverishly to blanket the country with a new lineup of products, consisting of some of its biggest brand names reformulated with a witches’ brew of synthetic sweeteners – a combination of high fructose corn syrup, aspartame and acesulfame potassium (what the company calls its “proprietary blend”).  The selling point is that each supposedly contains no more than 10 calories per 12-ounce serving, which accounts for the special designation under which they’re being marketed  –“TEN.”

Since HFCS is the second ingredient in the three “TENs” I looked at, Canada Dry Ginger Ale, 7Up and Dr. Pepper, I couldn’t help wondering what the fructose amount is in the HFCS being used. After all, Archer Daniels Midland, one of the biggest manufacturers of this test-tube sweetener, has run ads for a product called “Cornsweet 90” a HFCS blend containing 90 percent fructose that it has called “the ideal choice for reduced calorie foods such as beverages…” And the Corn Refiners Association (CRA) itself has acknowledged in a letter to the Food and Drug Administration that this mega-fructose additive has been in use “with FDA knowledge for decades” (more on that in a minute). So I called the Dr. Pepper Snapple company press office with my question.

In the short conversation I had with company spokesperson Chris Barnes, I leaned more ‘ad speak’ than I could have in a Mad Men marathon. Terms like the “broader TEN platform,” “mouth feel,” “broader flavor system,” and my favorite, the “lapsed soft drink consumer” were dropped repeatedly in our talk. But when I got to my fructose question, Chris didn’t have an answer for me other than “I don’t know that we do share specific ingredient information beyond what’s on the label.” He did ask why I was interested and promised to follow up with the research and development department, but felt fairly sure the company wouldn’t divulge that information.

Although I didn’t get any further insight about fructose amounts from Barnes, he did tell me how “very excited” the company is so far with how “TEN” is “performing,” allowing folks who had concerns over taste and calories to now have the “benefit” of a soft drink once again.

A shocking acknowledgment

Now admittedly, the question of fructose amounts in HFCS is a touchy subject, something the CRA likes to gloss over by repeatedly asserting that the additive isn’t really high in fructose (one reason it had unsuccessfully sought to change its name to “corn sugar”) and telling consumers over and over that HFCS is “virtually the same” as real sugar, which is a 50/50 combination of glucose and fructose.

But contrary to the big public relations blitz put out by the CRA claiming that “sugar is sugar,” a growing body of evidence has come to light showing  that HFCS is apparently being used by food and beverage manufacturers in highly fluctuating fructose amounts, including the mega-90 version. Such findings led Citizens for Health to file a petition with the Food and Drug Administration last September, which asked the agency to take action against manufacturers using HFCS with fructose levels above 55 percent, the highest amount the FDA allows, and in the interim, to require the actual amount of fructose it contains to be specified on product labels. (To sign and support that petition, click here).

The CRA response to the FDA about that petition was a shocking acknowledgment that, in violation of FDA regulations, HFCS-90 has been used in the food supply “with FDA knowledge for decades.”  The letter, signed by CRA interim president J. Patrick Mohan, also refers to “fluctuations in fructose levels above 42 or 55%” in HFCS, that he apparently believes “would be expressly permitted” by the agency.

But despite Mohan’s apparent belief that all is fine and dandy regardless of what the actual fructose amount in an HFCS blend might be, the FDA has made it perfectly clear that HFCS 90 “contains a substantially different ratio of glucose to fructose than…HFCS-55,” and that the agency doesn’t have enough information to “ensure that this product is safe.”

Numerous medical experts and extensive studies have linked excess fructose consumption to a wide variety of health problems, such as obesity, diabetes, liver and heart disease. And for the CRA, which spent many millions of dollars to tell consumers that HFCS really isn’t high in fructose at all, this statement is quite telling.

But for now, the matter of just how much fructose might be in those new Dr. Pepper/Snapple Group formulas remains a mystery. Which is something you might want to keep in mind before you reach for a “TEN” on your supermarket shelf in the belief that you can now have the “benefit” of drinking soda without having to worry about the consequences.

 

http://foodidentitytheft.com/newly-reformulated-10-calorie-sodas-leave-fructose-levels-a-mystery/

Yes, it really does matter where you put the price tags!!

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 29, 2013 by ecofrenfood

 Yes, it really does matter where you put the price tags!!

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FOOD SENSITIVITY TESTING

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 17, 2013 by ecofrenfood

FOOD SENSITIVITY TESTING

No diet fits for any one person, yet we do find that the closer one adheres to the principles of a genetically-based traditional diet (Paleolithic), the healthier they get.  One of the modifications in this Paleolithic way of eating is the removal of foods that create gut sensitivities and allergic responses throughout the entire body. 

So many people ask about the differences between allergies and sensitivities to food, and are surprised when traditional testing methods do not reveal evidence of allergies.   It is possible and very common to have severe responses and sensitivities to foods without evidence on a blood, stool, or saliva test.  When a food item is ingested there is a local response in the tissue of the gut which can trigger GALT (Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue) activation with the subsequent nitric oxide signaling and an up-regulation of inflammation.  This GALT activation often happens in reaction to antibiotics and hormones found in factory farmed meat and dairy products, and chemical exposure from processed foods.  This up-regulation of inflammation can cause a range of symptoms from upset stomach to chronic joint pain and can also lead to chronic problems in the gut such as leaky gut syndrome or abnormal intestinal permeability (see Digestive Disorders) which often leads to chronic disease.

Since the digestive system is a major immune system organ with an estimated 40-70% of defense activity taking place in the Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue, it is vitally important to restore gut health by removing any foods that might be an irritant to the tissue and repairing any gut dysfunction that may be present.   We find in order to accurately test for these food sensitivities we must combine biofeedback screening with actual food samples.

 http://www.infinite-wellness.net/food-sensitivity-testing.aspx

 

 

“I had chronic digestive problems for years and had been tested by many doctors with no answers to my situation.  It was getting so that I was constantly bloated and gassy and never felt like I could digest my food.  My digestion was so bad I always had something coming out one end or the other.  I began to gain weight and noticed that I was getting colds or sinus infections almost every other month.  Something was seriously wrong.  I was recommended to see Sabrina and on my first visit she tested me for food sensitivities and had me remove a list of foods and recommended new food choices.  She also tested me for supplements and asked me to come back in five weeks.  I began the food removal for the first week and waited to take the supplements.  Just by removing those foods I began to digest my food, no longer had bloating or had to run to the restroom on an hourly basis.  I am really amazed at how food sensitivities and even bad food choices have such a big impact on health.  After doing some nutritional testing and supplementation, I am no longer having sinus infections or colds and I am able to get through the day without a nap.  I am now a believer that food choices are our health choices.”

                                                                            -Barb A., Littleton, CO-

Reasons Why Food Sucks

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 17, 2013 by ecofrenfood

December 10, 2012

Reasons Why Food Sucks

1. You eat, then a few hours later you’re hungry again.
2. It messes up your face.
3. It gets stuck in your teeth at the worst possible time.
4. It makes your breath stink.
5. It makes you fart.
6. It makes you poo.
7. It can get you really sick and make you barf.
8. It makes you thirsty, then you have to drink water, and that opens a whole other can of worms.  (Please see “Reasons Why Water Sucks” volumes 1,2, and 3).
9. It makes you fat.
10. It makes you feel like a lazy lion.
11. It gets your teeth all dirty.
12. You HAVE to eat, so you’re a slave to food for your entire life.  Food is your master!  Ahhhhhh!
13. It makes you have to wash your hands and use napkins.
14. It can taste really bad.
15. It can smell up the whole place.
16. When other people are eating food, then you might get hungry too.
17. Did I mention it makes you POO?
18. You get grumpy and start making all these dorky noises when you don’t have food.
19. It can burn and start fires.
20. It makes you indecisive cuz there are so many different types of food.  Then you waste all this time trying to decide while your stomach growls away.  Then you don’t get to eat cuz you spent so much time deciding what you want to eat that you’re now late for your chiropractor appointment.  Then your chriopractor gets pissed and cracks your back in half.

That’s why I say: SCREW FOOD!

http://www.mondaiji.com/blog/other/general/10157-reasons-why-food-sucks

Drinking Water, Sanitation & Hygiene

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 1, 2013 by ecofrenfood
Drinking Water, Sanitation & Hygiene

The UN suggests that each person needs 20-50 litres of water a day to ensure their basic needs for drinking, cooking and cleaning.
Source: World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP)

In 2010, 89 % of the world’s population, or 6.1 billion people, used improved drinking water sources, exceeding the MDG target (88 %); 92 % are expected to have access in 2015. By 2015, 67 % will have access to improved sanitation facilities (the MDG target is 75 %).
Source: WHO

Between 1990 and 2010, two billion people gained access to improved drinking water sources and 1.8 billion people gained access to improved sanitation facilities.
Source: WHO

11% of the global population, or 783 million people, are still without access improved sources of drinking water.
Source: JMP 2012

Globally, diarrhoea is the leading cause of illness and death, and 88 per cent of diarrhoeal deaths are due to a lack of access to sanitation facilities, together with inadequate availability of water for hygiene and unsafe drinking water.
Source: JMP

The provision of improved sanitation and safe drinking water could reduce diarrhoeal diseases by nearly 90 per cent.
Source: JMP

Today 2.5 billion people, including almost one billion children, live without even basic sanitation. Every 20 seconds, a child dies as a result of poor sanitation. That’s 1.5 million preventable deaths each year.
Source: WWDR, 2012


In Sub-Saharan Africa, treating diarrhoea consumes 12 percent of the health budget. On a typical day, more than half the hospital beds in are occupied by patients suffering from faecal-related disease.
Source: WSSCC

Washing hands with soap can reduce the risk of diarrhoeal diseases by up to 47 per cent.
Source: WHO

The first ever global handwashing day was celebrated on 15 October during the International Year of Sanitation.
While the percent of population with access to improved facilities increased since 1990 in all regions, the number of people living without access has increased due to slow progress and population growth. In 2008, 2.6 billion people had still no access to improved sanitation facilities.
The Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target is to reduce by half the proportion of people without access to basic sanitation by 2015.
Source: World Bank

Resourcing of the water, sanitation and hygiene sector is relatively low priority compared to other sectors. In many countries, policies and programmes underemphasise adequate financing and human resource development to sustain the existing infrastructure and to expand access to sanitation, drinking-water and hygiene services.
Source: UN-Water: GLAAS, 2012

Overall, the number of cholera cases for the decade 2000–2010 increased by 130 %.
Source: WHO, 2010

With increasing populations living in peri-urban slums and refugee camps, as well as increasing numbers of people exposed to the impacts of humanitarian crises, the risk from cholera will likely increase worldwide.
Source: WWDR, 2012

63 % of the global population use toilets and other improved sanitation facilities.
2.5 billion people lack improved sanitation.
1.1 billion people (15 % of the global population) practice open defecation.
949 million open defecators live in rural areas.
Source: WHO 2012