Archive for ecofrenfun

Fermented food for gut health

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 14, 2013 by ecofrenfood

Every food expert on the planet will tell you that the healthiest foods are usually the freshest. But the latest beneficial food group isn’t a bit farm to table—it’s fermented—meaning ingredients like cabbage and cucumbers have been left to sit and steep until their sugars and carbs become bacteria-boosting agents.

Wellness experts are currently enthralled by how these pungent, probiotic powerhouses, which boost the good bacteria in your digestive tract, can help heal a multitude of health issues, like leaky gut and IBS, and can even lead to weight loss, better skin, and boosted immunity.

One of the reasons? “The gut is the largest part of our immune system,” explains Drew Ramsey, M.D., author of The Happiness Diet and 50 Shades of Kale. So it matters what you put in it. “Sugar and refined carbohydrates cause damage, while fermented foods heal.”

Ready to see what these (somewhat skunky) superfoods can do for you? Here are seven to try now. —Jennifer Kass
fermented

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Kombucha

A fizzy, fermented black tea that’s no stranger to New Yorkers, kombucha gives you a bang for your bacterial buck because of the variety of microorganisms it contains. “When you drink a bottle of kombucha, you’re drinking four to seven microorganisms all at once, building a really strong gut,” explains Michael Schwartz, the fermented-foodie founder of BAO Food And Drink. Just watch the sugar.

 

kombucha

2. Sauerkraut

Turns out you should put sauerkraut, AKA fermented cabbage, on way more than your tofu dogs. It has a powerful impact on brain health, including depression and anxiety. “There’s a tremendous connection between gut and brain health,” explains Dr. Ramsey. If you’re the DIY type, try making your own. (Here’s an easy recipe!) Unlike non-refrigerated, store-bought varieties, homemade ‘kraut has no chemical preservatives or added sugar.

sauerkraut2

http://www.wellandgoodnyc.com/2013/08/09/7-fermented-foods-you-should-be-eating/#7-fermented-foods-you-should-be-eating-3

3. Pickles

Pickles are the gateway ferment. Not only do they provide a healthy dose of probiotics, they’re a familiar food item and have a taste that many people already love—including those who may hold their nose at the idea of eating fermented foods.

pickles3

4. Coconut Yogurt

Kimberley Snyder, celebrity nutritionist and author of The Beauty Detox Foods, loves coconut yogurt, because it’s a delicious, dairy-free way to work plenty of enzymes and probiotics into your diet. Though Greek and regular yogurt are also fermented foods, Snyder is less enthusiastic about them. “Dairy is extremely acid-forming in the body and difficult to digest,” she explains.

coconut yogurt

5. Miso

Jeff Cox, author of The Essential Book of Fermentation, loves miso for its nutritional profile. The paste made from fermented soybeans and grains is “full of essential minerals, like potassium, and consists of millions of microorganisms giving us strength and stamina,” he says. To make miso soup, just add a dollop to boiling water, along with some favorite vegetables, like onions, bok choy, or mushrooms.

Screen shot 2013-08-01 at 8.24.15 PM

6. Tempeh

Tempeh (fermented soybeans) is a complete protein with all of the amino acids, says Cox. He suggests using it as a yummy substitute for bacon in BLTs. Try flavoring organic tempeh with some tamari (also fermented), then add it to a sandwich with tomato, lettuce, and toast. Or eat it tossed in a bowl of steamed veggies.

Tempeh

7. Kimchi

Think of this spicy Korean dish—typically made from fermented cabbage—as a beauty food, as well as an energy-booster, says Snyder. It can help “enhance digestion and nutrient assimilation,” she explains. “You may also notice, with improved digestion, an improvement in the look of your skin.”

Kimchi

http://www.wellandgoodnyc.com/2013/08/09/7-fermented-foods-you-should-be-eating/#7-fermented-foods-you-should-be-eating-9

Malaysia Keropok Lekor

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on August 1, 2013 by ecofrenfood

 

Fried Crackers, or,Keropok Lekor

Ingredients:

1 kg fish (ikan parang or ikan kembong)

500g sago flour

Salt to taste

125ml water

Some ice-cubes

1 or 2 pandan leaves


How to cook:

  1. Clean the fish thoroughly, remove its intestines and chop off its head and tail, leaving the body intact.
  2. Make slits along both sides of the fish, then scrape off the meat; discard the bones.
  3. Pound, chop or mince the meat finely, adding salt to taste.
  4. Add some ice cubes and continue mincing the fish meat.
  5. Add sago flour and water.
  6. Stir the mixture until it becomes a soft dough.
  7. Dip your hand in the sago flour and roll the dough into a cylindrical shape.
  8. Boil a potful of water.
  9. Add in one or two knotted pandan leaves.
  10. Drop the keropok lekor into the boiling water.Wait for it to float and remove with a slotted spoon.
  11. Set aside to cool.
  12. Cut the pieces diagonally into thin slices.
  13. Dry in the sun thoroughly, then deep-fry in hot oil.

 

To serve:

Serve with chilly source (normally serve)

http://www.foodmalaysia.net/recipe_collections/keropok-lekor

keropoklekor

Rat Poison Contamination

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 1, 2013 by ecofrenfood

Rat Poison Contamination

The active ingredient in rat poison is brodifacoum. It is used in baits to kill rodents such as mice and rats. It is sometimes referred to as a super-warfarin, because it is longer acting than the drug Warfarin. Warfarin is used to prevent blood clots in people.

How does brodifacoum cause poisoning?

Brodifacoum reduces Vitamin K in the body which leads to decreased blood clotting ability. If clotting ability is reduced significantly, bleeding can occur.

How much brodifacoum do you need to get sick?

It has not been established how much is needed. It varies from person to person. However, based on cases where bait has been consumed, a significant amount of bait in a contaminated food would need to be eaten to cause poisoning.

Children who have eaten “mouthful” amounts of bait have developed bleeding problems. The minimum amount required to depress normal blood clotting is estimated to be approximately 1.5mg for a child weighing 10kg.

Commonly available baits contain up to approximately 50mg/kg.  To eat 1.5mg of brodifacoum from bait, a child would need to eat approximately 30 grams of bait, which would be equivalent to a number of teaspoon size doses.  The amount needed in an older child or adult would be proportionately higher as the body weight increased.

Signs and Symptoms:

The active ingredient in rat poison is brodifacoum. It is used in baits to kill rodents such as mice and rats. It is sometimes referred to as a super-warfarin, because it is longer acting than the drug Warfarin. Warfarin is used to prevent blood clots in people.

Treatment:

The antidote for proven poisoning is vitamin K.  Exactly how this is given will depend on the person’s clinical condition.  As brodifacoum is a long-acting anticoagulant (a drug that prevents blood clotting), treatment may be needed for some weeks, but this will vary from case to case.

Effects of other medications/diseases

A person already on medication that affects blood clotting, for example warfarin, will be affected by a much smaller dose of brodifacoum than someone who is not on medication.  In addition, a person with significant pre-existing liver disease may also be more easily affected as they could already have abnormalities in their blood clotting system.

There are a number of other prescribed drugs and diseases that interact with brodifacoum, and these should be discussed with a general practitioner.

Help and Assistance:

If a person is concerned they may have eaten contaminated food, they should contact their local general practitioner as soon as possible.

http://www.healthier.qld.gov.au/conditions-treatments/rat-poison-contamination

Red meat: What makes it unhealthy?

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 17, 2013 by ecofrenfood

Red meat: What makes it unhealthy?

March 14, 2012|By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
  • Scientists said Monday that eating red meat was associated with an increased mortality risk in a recent study. But what is it in a juicy steak that makes it potentially unhealthy?
Scientists said Monday that eating red meat was associated with an increased… (Mark Boster / Los Angeles…)

On Monday, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health released study results showing that red meat consumption was associated with a higher risk of early death. The more red meat — beef, pork or lamb, for the purposes of the research — study participants reported they ate, the more likely they were to die during the period of time that data collection took place (more than 20 years).

So what is it in red meat that might make it unhealthy?

No one is sure, exactly, but the authors of the Harvard study mention a few possible culprits in their paper in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

First, eating red meat has been linked to the incidence of heart disease.  The saturated fat and cholesterol in beef, pork and lamb are believed to play a role in the risk of coronary heart disease.  The type of iron found in red meat, known as heme iron, has also been linked to heart attacks and fatal heart disease.  Sodium in processed meats may increase blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Other chemicals that are used in processed meats may play a role in heart disease as well, by damaging blood vessels.

Red meat has also been linked to increased risks of colorectal and other cancers.  Again, heme iron could be a culprit — it is more easily absorbed into the body than other forms of iron, and can cause oxidative damage to cells — as could compounds that are created when meat is cooked at a high temperature.  Preservatives used in processed meats also may play a role, scientists have said, because they convert into carcinogenic compounds in the body.

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/mar/14/news/la-heb-red-meat-why-bad-20120314