Archive for doctor ecofren

Drinking Water, Sanitation & Hygiene

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 1, 2013 by ecofrenfood
Drinking Water, Sanitation & Hygiene

The UN suggests that each person needs 20-50 litres of water a day to ensure their basic needs for drinking, cooking and cleaning.
Source: World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP)

In 2010, 89 % of the world’s population, or 6.1 billion people, used improved drinking water sources, exceeding the MDG target (88 %); 92 % are expected to have access in 2015. By 2015, 67 % will have access to improved sanitation facilities (the MDG target is 75 %).
Source: WHO

Between 1990 and 2010, two billion people gained access to improved drinking water sources and 1.8 billion people gained access to improved sanitation facilities.
Source: WHO

11% of the global population, or 783 million people, are still without access improved sources of drinking water.
Source: JMP 2012

Globally, diarrhoea is the leading cause of illness and death, and 88 per cent of diarrhoeal deaths are due to a lack of access to sanitation facilities, together with inadequate availability of water for hygiene and unsafe drinking water.
Source: JMP

The provision of improved sanitation and safe drinking water could reduce diarrhoeal diseases by nearly 90 per cent.
Source: JMP

Today 2.5 billion people, including almost one billion children, live without even basic sanitation. Every 20 seconds, a child dies as a result of poor sanitation. That’s 1.5 million preventable deaths each year.
Source: WWDR, 2012


In Sub-Saharan Africa, treating diarrhoea consumes 12 percent of the health budget. On a typical day, more than half the hospital beds in are occupied by patients suffering from faecal-related disease.
Source: WSSCC

Washing hands with soap can reduce the risk of diarrhoeal diseases by up to 47 per cent.
Source: WHO

The first ever global handwashing day was celebrated on 15 October during the International Year of Sanitation.
While the percent of population with access to improved facilities increased since 1990 in all regions, the number of people living without access has increased due to slow progress and population growth. In 2008, 2.6 billion people had still no access to improved sanitation facilities.
The Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target is to reduce by half the proportion of people without access to basic sanitation by 2015.
Source: World Bank

Resourcing of the water, sanitation and hygiene sector is relatively low priority compared to other sectors. In many countries, policies and programmes underemphasise adequate financing and human resource development to sustain the existing infrastructure and to expand access to sanitation, drinking-water and hygiene services.
Source: UN-Water: GLAAS, 2012

Overall, the number of cholera cases for the decade 2000–2010 increased by 130 %.
Source: WHO, 2010

With increasing populations living in peri-urban slums and refugee camps, as well as increasing numbers of people exposed to the impacts of humanitarian crises, the risk from cholera will likely increase worldwide.
Source: WWDR, 2012

63 % of the global population use toilets and other improved sanitation facilities.
2.5 billion people lack improved sanitation.
1.1 billion people (15 % of the global population) practice open defecation.
949 million open defecators live in rural areas.
Source: WHO 2012

Red meat: What makes it unhealthy?

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 17, 2013 by ecofrenfood

Red meat: What makes it unhealthy?

March 14, 2012|By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
  • Scientists said Monday that eating red meat was associated with an increased mortality risk in a recent study. But what is it in a juicy steak that makes it potentially unhealthy?
Scientists said Monday that eating red meat was associated with an increased… (Mark Boster / Los Angeles…)

On Monday, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health released study results showing that red meat consumption was associated with a higher risk of early death. The more red meat — beef, pork or lamb, for the purposes of the research — study participants reported they ate, the more likely they were to die during the period of time that data collection took place (more than 20 years).

So what is it in red meat that might make it unhealthy?

No one is sure, exactly, but the authors of the Harvard study mention a few possible culprits in their paper in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

First, eating red meat has been linked to the incidence of heart disease.  The saturated fat and cholesterol in beef, pork and lamb are believed to play a role in the risk of coronary heart disease.  The type of iron found in red meat, known as heme iron, has also been linked to heart attacks and fatal heart disease.  Sodium in processed meats may increase blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Other chemicals that are used in processed meats may play a role in heart disease as well, by damaging blood vessels.

Red meat has also been linked to increased risks of colorectal and other cancers.  Again, heme iron could be a culprit — it is more easily absorbed into the body than other forms of iron, and can cause oxidative damage to cells — as could compounds that are created when meat is cooked at a high temperature.  Preservatives used in processed meats also may play a role, scientists have said, because they convert into carcinogenic compounds in the body.

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/mar/14/news/la-heb-red-meat-why-bad-20120314

Can Certain Foods Really Save Your Life?

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 20, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Can Certain Foods Really Save Your Life?
‘Super foods’ can help prevent disease, prolong life, and more
By Kathleen M. Zelman, MPH, RD, LD
WebMD Weight Loss Clinic-Feature

Quinoa, broccoli, beans, and almonds hardly sound like life-savers. But according to scientific research and a few recent books, these and certain other foods are just that. Almost daily, new studies reveal more about the powerful substances found in particular foods, and how they can improve our health and/or prevent disease.

It’s true, experts say — what you put in your mouth really can affect how long you live, whether you get certain diseases, and how your body ages.

“Absolutely, there are foods that when added to the diet can make a significant health difference,” says David Grotto, RD, author of 101 Foods That Could Save Your Life.

He offers a few examples: “If you have arthritis, eat ginger, peppers, and yogurt; for headaches or migraines, try blueberries, mushrooms, or rosemary; insomnia sufferers, try cherries, Romaine lettuce, and walnuts; and if you are overweight, eggs, oats, and pears can help you slim down.”

Joy Bauer, MS, RD, Today Show registered dietitian and author of Joy Bauer’s Food Cures, agrees. “You can treat common health concerns, look younger, live longer, boost mood, and manage diabetes and more by choosing the right foods,” she says.

It seems that eating a variety of healthy foods — particularly fresh produce and whole grains — gives your body substances that help battle the “free radicals” that can damage cells. These foods may thus help boost immunity, and reduce inflammation at the cellular level. And that’s not all.

“There is not one or even a small number of nutrients — there are thousands of health-promoting, beneficial compounds such as phytonutrients, proteins, vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, that head off diseases that can shorten your life,” says Elizabeth Ward, MS, RD, author of The Pocket Idiot’s Guide to the New Food Pyramids.

Heart disease, stroke, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and certain cancers are just a few of the chronic conditions that a healthy diet can help to prevent.

But, experts add, it’s important to remember that diet alone is not the answer: “A healthy lifestyle includes regular physical activity, not smoking [and] controlling stress, along with a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and adequate amounts of low-fat dairy, lean meats, fish, and healthy fats,” Ward says.
14 Foods that Could Help Save Your Life

That said, here are 14 foods that deserve a place in your diet, along with their specific nutritional attributes, according to Joy Bauer’s Food Cures and 101 Foods That Could Save Your Life:

* Almonds: These nutritious nuggets are a good source of protein, fiber, vitamin E, and a variety of antioxidants. They can help with weight control and heart health, and may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.
* Barley: This whole grain is a rich source of vitamin E, fiber, B vitamins, and a wealth of antioxidants. Barley contains beta-glucan, which can help reduce the risk of heart disease.
* Quinoa: This is an ancient grain high in protein, fiber, iron, zinc, vitamin E, and selenium. It can help control your weight and help lower your risk for heart disease and diabetes.
* Coffee: In moderate doses, coffee may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, improve mood and memory, and, for men, reduce the risk of Parkinson’s disease.
* Eggs: They are low in calories (75 per egg), an excellent source of high-quality protein, and rich in folate, choline, and iron. They can play a role in eye health and weight management — an egg at breakfast helps to curb appetite.
* Grapes: They’re rich in vitamin C, potassium and quercetin. Preliminary studies have shown that quercetin may boost the immune system.
* Kale: This super-healthy green veggie has vitamins A, C, potassium, lutein, and zeaxathan, which can help reduce the incidence of certain cancers and macular degeneration.
* Ginger: This spice with anti-inflammatory properties may help lesson arthritis pain. It also quells upset stomachs, nausea, and motion sickness.
* Pecans: These nuts are rich in gamma tocopherol, a type of vitamin E, as well as a rich source of antioxidants.
* Sweet potatoes: They’re rich in vitamin A and C, high in fiber, and naturally sweet. Sweet potatoes are also an excellent source of lycopene which may fight heart disease, and breast and prostate cancer.
* Olive oil: This Mediterranean diet staple is rich in heart-healthy monounsaturated fats and plant compounds that have anti-inflammatory action to fight heart disease and cancer.

But the list of potentially life-saving foods is by no means limited to 14. For example, Wendy Bazilian and Steven Pratt, authors of The Super Foods Rx Diet, suggest 14 other super-nutritious foods: beans, blueberries, broccoli, oats, oranges, pumpkin, salmon, soy, spinach, tea, tomatoes, turkey, walnuts, and yogurt. (All but turkey are also mentioned in Joy Bauer’s Food Cures and 101 Foods That Could Save Your Life.)

What Makes a Super Food?

Several efforts are afoot to rank or score foods according to their nutritional profiles. But James Joseph, PhD, a researcher for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, says the various systems can be confusing. It’s easier, he says, to simply choose a wide variety of colorful produce, whole grains, nuts, fish, lean protein, and low-fat dairy.

“Most people don’t walk around with a pyramid or book on the healthiest foods but they do know their grocery stores,” says Joseph, author of The Color Code. “Avoid most of the center aisles and spend more time in the perimeter, where produce, dairy, meats, fish and whole grain bread are located.”

Venture into the interior aisles for whole grains, nuts, and simple frozen foods such as blueberries, he advises — but try to avoid refined flour, sugar, saturated and trans fats, and the temptations of the snack aisles.

And don’t forget that portion size matters, even when it comes to healthy foods. You can take more liberties when eating low-calorie fruits and simply prepared vegetables, but take care to eat other super foods in sensible portions.
Think Addition, Not Subtraction

Perhaps the best thing about “super foods,” experts say, is the idea that you can stop worrying so much about the foods you should avoid, and instead concentrate on foods you can add to your diet.

“People are tired of being told what not to eat, and if we could shift our advice to encourage them to start eating more good-for-you foods, they will recognize how delicious and filling healthy foods are and eat fewer of the less-healthy foods,” Grotto says.

http://www.webmd.com/cancer/nutrition-cancer-8/5-healthy-foods?page=2