Archive for delicious

Delicious food, disgusting ingredient

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 17, 2013 by ecofrenfood

184858318486051848597

 


Delicious food, disgusting ingredients

By  |  – Tue, Jun 7, 2011

On the latest episode of Jaimie Oliver’s Food Revolutionthe food activist chef came up with a brilliant way to break kids of their sweet tooth habit. He showed them what their desserts are really made of. Each kid got to make his or her own sundae and after they gobbled it down, he broke down some of more revolting ingredients in their high-calorie grub. It’s a radical approach but it may just be the cure for those late night binges. With that in mind, we collected some disgusting byproducts found in our favorite foods, to brainwash us into eating less of it. Will it work? It’s worth a shot. 

L-Cyesteine is a dough conditioner used in mass-produced bread products like bagels, donuts, rolls and crackers. And guess what’s needed to make L-Cyesteine? Hair. A recent study by the Vegetarian Resource Group found that human hair and hog hair were still used industry-wide, giving new meaning to the term “all-natural”.

 

The ingredient used to keep many packaged shredded cheeses from clumping is powdered cellulose, which is a fancy way of saying wood pulp that’s been chemically processed. Look out for the ingredient in your ice cream too. 


Secret ingredient: Sheep secretions-
The oils released from the fur of a sheep is the “gum base” used in many types of chewing gums for extra-moisture.

Secret Ingredient: cleaning agent-
Sodium bisulfite is a preservative used for bleaching out the discolorations and extending the lifespan of your average potato chip. It’s also an ingredient in most toilet bowl cleaners.

Secret Ingredient: crushed bugs-
Cochineal extract is a kind of red food dye found in many red-colored candies, sprinkles, strawberry flavored yogurts, jello, popsicles and most other “fruit-flavored” goodies. Turns out it’s not fruit responsible for the redness. The extract is actually made from the crushed and dried bodies of a red-colored insect called Dactylopius coccus costa. Still want to order dessert?

http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/delicious-food-disgusting-ingredients-2494322.html

184859918485931848591
1848587

 

18485891848591 1848581

184860118486031848595

Beautiful FOOD Photos – World’s Best Photographers meal

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 29, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Salt Intake is vital

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 23, 2011 by ecofrenfood


Use of salt is as old as human history. Oldest records come from China. Some 2,700 years B.C.-about 4,700 years ago-there was published in China the PENG-TZAO-KAN-MU. A major portion of this writing discussing of more than 40 kinds of salt, including descriptions of two methods of extracting salt and putting it in usable form that are amazingly similar to processes used today.

Unrefined sea salt contain 98.0 % NaCl (sodium-chloride) and up to 2.0% other minerals (salts) : Epsom salts and other Magnesium salts, Calcium salts, Potassium (Kalium) salts, Manganese salts, Phosphorus salts, Iodine salts, .. all together over 100 minerals composed of 80 chemical elements… Composition of crystal of ocean salt is so complicated that no laboratory in the world can produce it from its basic 80 chemical elements.
Nature is still better chemist than people.

This salt has been used since begining of life, by ocean plants, by animals and by people

Origin of Salt Layers

There are two theories. One says that mineral salt is layer of salt created after evaporation of old seas. According to other theory, layer of mineral salt was created by chemical reaction.

Mineral salt is often in crystal form. It is transparent crystal, or light tan in color with little darker flecks. But, it can also be of many different colors. Not all mineral salts are rich in trace elements. Some are similar to ocean salt, other are not.

If you ask me, I prefer Ocean salt.

Salt is a vital substance for the survival of all living creatures, particularly humans. Water and salt regulate the water content of the body. Water itself regulates the water content of the interior of the cell by working its way into all of the cells it reaches. It has to get there to cleanse and extract the toxic wastes of cell metabolisms. Salt forces some water to stay outside the cells. It balances the amount of water that stays outside the cells. There are two oceans of water in the body; one ocean is held inside the cells of the body, and the other ocean is held outside the cells. Good health depends on a most delicate balance between the volume of these oceans, and this balance is achieved by salt – unrefined salt.

When water is available to get inside the cells freely, it is filtered from the outside salty ocean and injected into the cells that are being overworked despite their water shortage. This is the reason why in severe dehydration we develop an edema and retain water. The design of our bodies is such that the extent of the ocean of water outside the cells is expanded to have the extra water available for filtration and emergency injection into vital cells. The brain commands an increase in salt and water retention by the kidneys. This is how we get an edema when we don’t drink enough water.

Initially, the process of water filtration and its delivery into the cells is more efficient at night when the body is horizontal. The collected water, that mostly pools in the legs, does not have to fight the force of gravity to get onto the blood circulation. If reliance of this process of emergency hydration of some cells continues for long, the lungs begin to get waterlogged at night, and breathing becomes difficult. The person needs more pillows to sit upright to sleep. This condition is the consequence of dehydration. However, you might overload the system by drinking too much water at the beginning. Increases in water intake must be slow and spread out until urine production begins to increase at the same rate that you drink water.

When we drink enough water to pass clear urine, we also pass out a lot of the salt that was held back. This is how we can get rid of edema fluid in the body; by drinking more water. Not diuretics, but more water!! In people who have an extensive edema and show signs of their heart beginning to have irregular or very rapid beats with least effort, the increase in water intake should be gradual and spaced out, but not withheld from the body. Naturally, salt intake should be limited for two or three days because the body is still in an overdrive mode to retain it. Once the edema has cleared up, salt should not be withheld from the body.

Salt has many other functions than just regulating the water content of the body.

Tasty but deadly

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2011 by ecofrenfood



Many types of imported fried fruits countries have been found to contain high levels of lead

Tasty but deadly
http://dailychilli.com/news/­267-tasty-but-deadly

1 of 2 9/10/2009 12:50 PM

Lead also poses risks to pregnant women and infants.

Malaysia’s move to bar the 18 brands of dried fruits comes in the wake of last

Friday’s move by the United States’ Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA)

advisory against eating dried fruits imported from Asia.

Testing results in Texas found that dried plums and products containing dried

plums contained lead as much as 300 times the acceptable level.

The FDA doe not have lead limits specifically for prunes, but the Centre for

Disease Control and Prevention has advised avoiding consumption of any

amount of lead.

The warning, however, did not apply to prunes from the US .

Black Ice-cream

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 10, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Japanese Black Sesame Ice Cream

Black Sesame Ice Cream and Grass Jelly

Black Forest ice cream