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Food Craze? Mexican Cookies Made With Grasshopper Powder

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2014 by ecofrenfood

Food Craze? Mexican Cookies Made With Grasshopper Powder

Insects and arachnids are popular snack foods in China, Thailand and other Asian countries. Grasshoppers are also important in Mexican cuisine, although the insects are much smaller than those enjoyed in Thailand. Their stratospheric protein content makes grasshoppers (or “chapulines”) a healthy snack popular with all age groups.

How Are Grasshoppers Used in Mexican Cuisine?

Grasshoppers are a popular Mexican snack food because they are inexpensive, have a mild flavor, light texture and a high protein content. Snackers prefer to eat small, whole grasshoppers in large quantities, seasoned with salt, pepper and chili powder. Crispy, fried “chapulines” occupy a place in Mexican snacking culture akin to popcorn in America. Huge platters of tiny red grasshoppers are popular in tapas restaurants and are also eaten as bar food.

What Is Grasshopper Powder?

Powdered grasshopper is a condiment made from seasoned, cooked, pulverized insects. The powder is a popular at restaurants, where diners sprinkle it over soups, tacos, enchiladas and other dishes. Unflavored grasshopper powder also adds an extra protein boost to sweet dishes.

What Are Powdered Grasshopper Cookies?

Powdered grasshopper cookies are high in protein, low in fat and have the same appeal as traditional cookies made with eggs and butter. They have a delicious flavor and hearty, chewy texture. The most popular flavors of these “secret grasshopper food” cookies are oatmeal and oatmeal raisin.

Why Are Whole Grasshoppers Not Used in Cookies?

Powdering grasshoppers before adding them to cookie batter makes it impossible to tell that the cookies contain insects. Grasshoppers are very popular in southern Mexico, where poverty is a severe problem. Many northern Mexicans refuse to eat the whole “chapulines” because they do not rely on the insects for dietary protein. Powdering the grasshoppers substantially increases the market potential of commercial cookie brands and increases the viability of “secret grasshopper food” cookies in northern Mexican public schools.

Are Grasshopper Powder Cookies Related to the Minty Treats Called Grasshopper Cookies?

Grasshopper powder cookies are not related to the popular “grasshopper cookies” made with chocolate and mint. The green “grasshopper powder” sold at American gourmet boutiques is a sweet dessert sprinkle made from mint and white chocolate. The powder is delicious in cookies, shakes and frozen desserts, but it is unrelated to the protein-rich Mexican insect powder.

Although grasshoppers are most popular as a savory snack food, their nutritional profile also makes them an attractive addition to baked goods. Powdering the cooked insects makes them indistinguishable from plant-based baking ingredients such as powdered cinnamon and whole wheat flour, which also have a reddish appearance. This is a necessary step that makes powdered grasshopper cookies universally palatable.

http://recipes.answers.com/article/879409/food-craze-mexican-cookies-made-with-grasshopper-powder

Taiwan Reels From Gutter Oil Scandal

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2014 by ecofrenfood

Taiwan Reels From Gutter Oil Scandal

The top five cancer-causing foods

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 5, 2013 by ecofrenfood

The top five cancer-causing foods

Tuesday, April 24, 2007
by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger
Ever wonder which foods should be strongly avoided by those at high risk for cancer? We can begin identifying cancer-causing foods once we know which ingredients in our food cause cancer. Some of those ingredients are food additives and chemicals used to enhance taste, while others are used strictly for appearance or to increase product shelf life. The key to avoiding cancer-causing foods is knowing which ingredients are carcinogens — or cancer promoters — and then reading food labels to permanently avoid consuming those ingredients.Cancer tumors develop, in part, by feeding on sugar in the bloodstream. If you eat lots of sugary snacks loaded with simple carbs, you’re loading your bloodstream with the chemical energy needed for cancer cells (and tumors) to proliferate. No biological system can live without fuel for its chemical processes, including cancer cells. Thus, one of the strategies to pursue for any anti-cancer diet is to eat low-glycemic diet. That means no refined sugars… ever! No refined grains (white flour, for example), no heavy use of sweeteners and the lifetime avoidance of sugary soda pop. Aside from starving tumors, eating foods low in sugar and avoiding simple carbs will also keep your weight in check while helping prevent blood sugar disorders such as type-2 diabetes.

What to avoid on the labels: high-fructose corn syrup, sugar, sucrose, enriched bleached flour, white rice, white pastas, white breads and other “white” foods.

The dangers of hydrogenated oils

 

Hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils — another danger — are developed from otherwise harmless, natural elements. To make them hydrogenated, oils are heated in the presence of hydrogen and metal catalysts. This process helps prolong shelf life but simultaneously creates trans fats, which only have to be disclosed on the label if the food contains more than 0.5 grams per serving. To avoid listing trans fats, or to claim “trans fat free” on their label, food manufacturers simply adjust the serving size until the trans fat content falls under 0.5 grams per serving. This is how you get modern food labels with serving sizes that essentially equate to a single bite of food. Not exactly a “serving” of food, is it?

Besides being a cancer factor, trans fats promote heart disease, interrupt metabolic processes, and cause belly fat that crowd the organs and strain the heart. The essential fatty acids that the hydrogenation process removes are responsible for a number of processes in your body. When trans fats replace these essential fatty acids, they occupy the same space without doing the same job. The “anchor” portion of the fatty acid is in place (which is how the body recognizes the fatty acid and puts it to work) but the chemically active part of the fatty acid is twisted, distorted, and missing vital parts.

After the hydrogenation process, the fatty acid can’t biochemically function in the same way. Things like brain cell function, hormones, gland function, oxygen transport, cell wall function (keeping things in or out of your cells) and digestive tract operation (putting together nutrients and blocking allergens) are adversely affected.

Food manufacturers don’t tell you this on the product label, of course. Your body needs essential fatty acids and you are programmed to keep eating until you get them. If you’re only eating trans fats, you’ll never feel fully satiated, because your body will never get the fatty acids it needs for essential function. Since cancer needs high blood sugar and low oxygen levels, a person with lots of belly fat who just can’t seem to put down those trans fat cookies or crackers (also loaded with flour and simple sugars) presents the ideal environment for the development of cancer.

The acrylamide factor

Since trans fats are often formed during the frying process, we should also talk about acrylamides. Acrylamides are not added into food; they are created during the frying process. When starchy foods are subjected to high heat, acrylamides form. A Swedish study found that acrylamides cause cancer in rats, and more studies are under way to confirm the understanding that acrylamides also cause cancer in humans.

Sodium nitrite (and nitrates)

 

Food companies add sodium nitrite into certain foods on purpose. This carcinogen is added to processed meats, hot dogs, bacon, and any other meat that needs a reddish color to look “fresh.” Decades ago when meats were preserved, it was done with salt. But in the mid 20th century, food manufacturers started using sodium nitrite in commercial preservation. This chemical is responsible for the pinkish color in meat to which consumers have grown accustomed. Although today the use of refrigeration is largely what protects consumers from botulism and bacteria, manufacturers still add sodium nitrite to make the meat look pinkish and fresh.

The nitrites themselves are not the problem. People get more nitrites from vegetables than they do from meat, according to research by the University of Minnesota. During the digestion process, however, sodium nitrite is converted to nitrosamine, and that’s where the cancer problems begin. Nitrosamine is a carcinogen, but since it is not technically an ingredient, its presence can be easily overlooked on the packaging. Nitrosamines are also found in food items that are pickled, fried, or smoked; in things such as beer, cheese, fish byproducts, and tobacco smoke.

Knowing about all these ingredients doesn’t mean there is simply a “short list” of foods that should be avoided. You have to vigilant and read labels constantly. Here are the five worst offenders:

    • Hot dogs: The Cancer Prevention Coalition recommends that children should not eat more than 12 hot dogs per month because of the risk of cancer. If you must have your hot dog fix, look for those without sodium nitrite listed among the ingredients.
    • Processed meats and bacon: These meats almost always contain the same sodium nitrite found in hot dogs. You can find some without nitrites, but you’ll have to look for them in natural grocers or health food stores. Bacon is also high in saturated fat, which contributes to the risk of cancers, including breast cancer. Limiting your consumption of processed meats and saturated fats also benefits the heart.
    • Doughnuts: Doughnuts contain hydrogenated oils, white flour, sugar, and acrylamides. Essentially, they’re one of the worst cancer foods you can possibly eat. Reader’s Digest calls doughnuts “disastrous” as a breakfast food, and many experts agree it’s probably one of the worst ways to start the day.
    • French fries: Fries are made with hydrogenated oil and fried at high temperatures. Some chains even add sugar to their fry recipe to make them even more irresistible. Not only do they clog your arteries with saturated fat and trans fat, they also contain acrylamides. They should be called “cancer fries,” not French fries.
  • Chips / crackers / cookies: These generally contain white flour and sugar as well as trans fats, but it’s not enough to simply look for these ingredients on the label; you have to actually “decode” the ingredients list that food manufacturers use to deceive consumers. They do this by hiding ingredients (such as hiding MSG in yeast extract, or by fiddling with serving sizes so they can claim the food is trans fat free, even when it contains trans fats (the new Girl Scout cookies use this trick).

Besides avoiding these foods, what else can consumers do to reduce their risk of cancer? The main things are simple: Eat unprocessed foods and base your diet largely on plants. Consume foods that have omega-3 fats and other essential fatty acids. Eat lots of fruits and vegetables; many common ones have known cancer-fighting properties. Get regular vigorous exercise, since tumors cannot thrive in highly oxygenated environments. Keep your blood sugar stable to avoid being an all-you-can-eat buffet for cancer cells.

Eat foods high in natural vitamin C, a nutrient that deters the conversion of nitrite into nitrosamine and promotes healthy immune function. Make sure you get adequate amounts of cancer-fighting vitamin D through exposure to sunlight — about 10 to 15 minutes each day if you have fair skin, or ten times as long if you have dark skin pigmentation. Stay well hydrated to ensure that your body rids itself of toxins. Avoid smoking and don’t use conventional fragrance, cosmetics and personal care products — virtually all of them contain cancer-causing chemicals.

Preventing cancer is actually quite straightforward. Even the World Health Organization says that 70 percent of all cancers can be prevented with simple changes in diet and lifestyle. The truth is that most people give themselves cancer through the foods, drinks and products they choose to consume. In my opinion, over 90 percent of cancers are easily preventable.

By the way, don’t you find it interesting that the cancer industry seems to have no interest whatsoever in urging people to avoid eating sodium nitrite, or to stop using cancer-causing skin care products, or to get more sunlight on their skin so they can prevent cancer with vitamin D? As you’ll read in many other articles I’ve written here, it is my firm belief that the cancer industry has no interest whatsoever in preventing cancer, and it primarily interested in treating cancer for profit.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/021808_cancer_prevention.html#ixzz2H4hqCzmv

http://www.naturalnews.com/021808_cancer_prevention.html#ixzz2H4XdxdNF

The Worst Foods for Your Eyes

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2012 by ecofrenfood

The Worst Foods for Your Eyes
Written by Kristy White

One of the keys to improving eyesight naturally is maintaining well-balanced diet. Essentially, this means that you need to eat a variety of products from all food categories in order to supply your eyes with all the nutrients they need.

It is likely that the majority of the food products you consume are not harmful for your eyes. However, the way you prepare them and your eating habits can turn them into the worst foods for your eyes.

It would be too much to say that something is totally bad for your vision however there are many food products that may have negative impact on your vision or speed up the progression of some common eye disorders. Here are some of the worst foods for your eyes that you need to avoid.

Junk food. Candies, chips, cookies, even some nuts can have a detrimental effect on eyes. According to Good Morning America recent news, a new study suggests that “Vegetable, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, along with linoleic acid are the type of fats that put junk food enthusiasts at a higher risk for the eye disease”. Not only the fats contained in junk food are bad for your eyes, but the abundant amounts of sugar or salt many snacks contain. Salt and sugar are notorious for their negative impact on vision.

Margarine. Many consider margarine a healthier choice to butter because of its plant origin. The truth is that margarine, along with other commonly used hydrogenated oils such as peanut butter and soybean oil, is potentially bad for your eyes. Hydrogenation is an industrial method for turning liquid vegetable oils into solid ones. During the process of hydrogenation vegetable fat molecules not only lose almost all of their beneficial vitamins and minerals but are transformed into trans-fats. Trans-fats are extremely dangerous for your overall health and for your eye health in particular.

Deep fried foods. If you want to enjoy 20/20 vision for longer, forget about deep-fried foods. Not only prolonged heating of the oil changes its structure and makes it bad for your eyes but most of the foods simply loose their nutritional value when deep-fried. By eating too much deep fried foods, you increase the amounts of free-radicals in your body (they damage the eye cells and lead to various eye disorders plus speed up the natural processes of aging) and decrease the amounts of the nutrients that can fight those free-radicals. For instance, sweet potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin C – a well known free radical scavenger. However, by frying them, you turn them into one of the worst foods for your eyes because frying destroys nearly all vitamin C content and saturates them with harmful trans-fats from the frying oils.

High sugary foods. “Eating lots of sugary, starchy foods may make eyes more vulnerable to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), America’s top cause of vision loss.” reports WebMD. Any food item that causes your blood sugar to rise rapidly, for instance chocolate, puts the most important part of your eye – the retina, at risk. You can still indulge a sweet bite from time to time but chose carbohydrates that don’t make your blood sugar spike quickly.

Gingerbread men

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 15, 2010 by ecofrenfood


Gingerbread men
Makes
20

Ingredients
125g unsalted butter, softened
1/2 firmly packed cup (100g) brown sugar
1/2 cup (115g) golden syrup
1 egg yolk
2 1/2 cups (450g) plain flour
1 tbs ground ginger
1 tsp mixed spice
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1 cup (150g) icing sugar, sifted
Silver cachous, to decorate

Method
Preheat oven to 180°C. Line 2 large baking trays. In a large bowl, beat butter and sugar using electric beaters until thick. Beat in syrup and yolk, then use a spoon to fold in flour, ginger, spice and soda until a smooth dough. Form into a disc and cover in plastic wrap. Chill for 30 minutes.

Bring dough to room temperature, then divide in 2. Roll out pieces between baking paper to 5mm thick. Use a gingerbread man cutter (we used a 7cm and a 12cm) to cut shapes. Space out on trays (you may need to bake in batches). Bake for 10 minutes or until golden. Using a skewer, quickly make 5mm holes at the top of the warm biscuits to thread ribbon. Cool completely on a rack.

Stir icing sugar with 2-3 tsp warm water to make a stiff icing. Transfer to a piping bag with a small plain nozzle. (Or place mixture in a snap-lock bag, push icing into a corner, then snip off corner). Pipe 3 small dots down each biscuit, then press in cachous and thread ribbon in holes. The biscuits will keep in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

Bring on spring with gorgeous lamb recipes, salad recipes and strawberry & pineapple recipes.


Papaya was the only studied food found to halt breast cancer

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 19, 2010 by ecofrenfood

Papaya was the only studied food found to halt breast cancer

Scientists studied 14 plant foods commonly consumed in Mexico to determine their ability to halt breast cancer cell growth. These included avocado, black sapote, fuava, mango, prickly pear cactus (nopal), pineapple, grapes, tomato, and papaya. They also evaluated beta-carotene, total plant phenolics, and gallic acid contents and antioxidant capacity. They found that only papaya had a significant effect on stopping breast cancer cell growth. (International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition, May)

Papaya is a store-house of cancer fighting lycopene

The intense orangey-pink color of papaya means it is chock full of cancer fighting carotenoids. Not only beta carotene, but lycopene is found in abundance. The construction of lycopene makes it highly reactive toward oxygen and free radicals. Scientists at the University of Illinois think this anti-oxidant activity contributes to its effectiveness as a cancer fighting agent. Epidemiological studies have indicated an inverse relationship between lycopene intake and prostate cancer risk. They showed that oral lycopene is highly bioavailable, accumulates in prostate tissue, and is localized in the nucleus of prostate epithelial cells.

In addition to antioxidant activity, other experiments have indicated that lycopene induces cancer cell death, anti-metastatic activity, and the up-regulation of protective enzymes. Phase I and II studies have established the safety of lycopene supplementation. (Cancer Letter, October 8, 2008)

Prostate cancer was the subject of a study in Australia that looked at 130 prostate cancer patients and 274 hospitalized controls. The scientists found that men who consumed the most lycopene-rich fruits and vegetables such as papaya were 82% less likely to have prostate cancer. In this study, green tea also exerted a powerf! ul anti-cancer effect. When lycopene-rich foods were consumed with green tea, the combination was even more effective, an outcome the researchers credited to their synergy. ( Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2007)

Isothiocyanates found in papaya restore the cell cycle to eliminate cancer

Organo-sulfur compounds called isothiocyanates are found in papaya. In animal experiments, isothiocyanates protected against cancers of the breast, lung, colon pancreas, and prostate, as well as leukemia, and they have the potential to prevent cancer in humans. Isothiocyanates have shown themselves capable of inhibiting both the formation and development of cancer cells through multiple pathways and mechanisms. (International Journal of Oncology), October, 2008)

Researchers in Japan clarified the mechanisms of action in a type of isothiocyanate found in papaya known as BITC, that underlies the relationship between cell cycle regulation and appropriate cell death. When cancerous cells die on schedule, they are no longer a problem. The researchers established that BITC exerted cancer cell killing effects that were greater in the proliferating cells than in the quiescent cells. Cancer cells that are proliferating are much more dangerous than cancer cells that are in a state of dormancy. (Forum of Nutrition, 2009)

Enzymes from papaya digest proteins including those that protect tumors

The fruit and other parts of the papaya tree, also known as the paw paw tree, contain papain and chymopapain, powerful proteolytic enzymes that facilitate chemical reactions in the body. They promote digestion by helping to break down proteins from food into amino acids that can be recombined to produce protein useable by humans. Proteolytic enzymes protect the body from inflammation and help heal burns. They do a good job of digesting unwanted scar tissue both on the skin and under its surface.

Research has shown that the physical an! d mental health of people is highly dependent on their ability to produce proteins they can use effectively. However, as people age, they produce less of the enzymes needed to effectively digest proteins from food and free needed amino acids. They are left with excessive amounts of undigested protein which can lead to overgrowth of unwanted bacteria in the intestinal tract, and a lack of available amino acids.

Eating papaya after a meal promotes digestion, and helps prevent bloating, gas production, and indigestion. It is quite helpful after antibiotic use to replenish friendly intestinal bacteria that were the casualties in the war against the unwanted bacteria. When the intestinal tract is well populated with friendly bacteria, the immune system is strengthened, and can better protect against flu and cancer.

Being a proteolytic enzyme, papain is able to destroy intestinal parasites, which are composed mostly of protein. To rid the body of intestinal parasites, half a cup of papaya juice can be alternated each hour for twelve consecutive hours with the same amount of cucumber or green bean juice.

Papaya contains fibrin, another useful compound not readily found in the plant kingdom. Fibrin reduces the risk of blood clots and improves the quality of blood cells, optimizing the ability of blood to flow through the circulatory system. Fibrin is also important in preventing stokes. Proteolytic enzymes containing fibrin are a good idea for long plane rides to minimize the potential of blood clots in the legs. People who sit at a desk all day might want to use proteolytic enzymes too.

Proteolytic enzymes are able to digest and destroy the defense shields of viruses, tumors, allergens, yeasts, and various forms of fungus. Once the shield is destroyed, tumors and invading organisms are extremely vulnerable and easily taken care of by the immune system.

Undigested proteins can penetrate the gut and wind up in the bloodstream where they are treated by the immune system as invaders. If too many undigested proteins are floating around, the immune system becomes overburdened and unable to attend to the other tasks it was meant to do. Proteolytic enzymes can digest these rogue proteins, freeing up the immune system.

Italian Vanilla Christmas Cookies

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on December 3, 2009 by ecofrenfood

Italian Vanilla Cookies:

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups Crisco or other shortening
1 1/2 cups sugar
6 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla
Tip: Blend eggs and sugar; then add shortening)

Sift and add to above:
6 cups flour
6 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt.

Directions:

Mix with spoon and then knead with hands. Roll dough into 1- to 2-inch balls (Peggie makes the smaller balls), or roll strips of dough into “S” curved shapes.

Bake on ungreased cookie sheet at 400 degrees for 10 minutes.

Tip: Peggie bakes these for 8-10 minutes, sometimes turns oven down to 375.

Cookies will still be soft when removed from oven (not crispy).

Make icing of confectionery sugar, warm milk, vanilla, butter (optional: red and green food coloring). Dip top of cookie in white, red or green icing for a glazed-like topping.

By Peggie C. Bohanon.