Archive for September, 2014

Food Craze? Mexican Cookies Made With Grasshopper Powder

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2014 by ecofrenfood

Food Craze? Mexican Cookies Made With Grasshopper Powder

Insects and arachnids are popular snack foods in China, Thailand and other Asian countries. Grasshoppers are also important in Mexican cuisine, although the insects are much smaller than those enjoyed in Thailand. Their stratospheric protein content makes grasshoppers (or “chapulines”) a healthy snack popular with all age groups.

How Are Grasshoppers Used in Mexican Cuisine?

Grasshoppers are a popular Mexican snack food because they are inexpensive, have a mild flavor, light texture and a high protein content. Snackers prefer to eat small, whole grasshoppers in large quantities, seasoned with salt, pepper and chili powder. Crispy, fried “chapulines” occupy a place in Mexican snacking culture akin to popcorn in America. Huge platters of tiny red grasshoppers are popular in tapas restaurants and are also eaten as bar food.

What Is Grasshopper Powder?

Powdered grasshopper is a condiment made from seasoned, cooked, pulverized insects. The powder is a popular at restaurants, where diners sprinkle it over soups, tacos, enchiladas and other dishes. Unflavored grasshopper powder also adds an extra protein boost to sweet dishes.

What Are Powdered Grasshopper Cookies?

Powdered grasshopper cookies are high in protein, low in fat and have the same appeal as traditional cookies made with eggs and butter. They have a delicious flavor and hearty, chewy texture. The most popular flavors of these “secret grasshopper food” cookies are oatmeal and oatmeal raisin.

Why Are Whole Grasshoppers Not Used in Cookies?

Powdering grasshoppers before adding them to cookie batter makes it impossible to tell that the cookies contain insects. Grasshoppers are very popular in southern Mexico, where poverty is a severe problem. Many northern Mexicans refuse to eat the whole “chapulines” because they do not rely on the insects for dietary protein. Powdering the grasshoppers substantially increases the market potential of commercial cookie brands and increases the viability of “secret grasshopper food” cookies in northern Mexican public schools.

Are Grasshopper Powder Cookies Related to the Minty Treats Called Grasshopper Cookies?

Grasshopper powder cookies are not related to the popular “grasshopper cookies” made with chocolate and mint. The green “grasshopper powder” sold at American gourmet boutiques is a sweet dessert sprinkle made from mint and white chocolate. The powder is delicious in cookies, shakes and frozen desserts, but it is unrelated to the protein-rich Mexican insect powder.

Although grasshoppers are most popular as a savory snack food, their nutritional profile also makes them an attractive addition to baked goods. Powdering the cooked insects makes them indistinguishable from plant-based baking ingredients such as powdered cinnamon and whole wheat flour, which also have a reddish appearance. This is a necessary step that makes powdered grasshopper cookies universally palatable.

http://recipes.answers.com/article/879409/food-craze-mexican-cookies-made-with-grasshopper-powder

Taiwan Reels From Gutter Oil Scandal

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2014 by ecofrenfood

Taiwan Reels From Gutter Oil Scandal

Less meat ‘key’ to food security

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2014 by ecofrenfood

Less meat ‘key’ to food security

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http://news.uk.msn.com/uk/articles?cp-documentid=261848975

Eating less meat is “essential” to ensure future demand for food can be met and “dangerous” climate change avoided, experts have warned.

A study by leading university researchers in Cambridge and Aberdeen found food production alone could exceed targets for greenhouse gas emissions in 2050 if current trends continue.

Population growth and the global shift towards “meat-heavy Western diets” has meant increasing agricultural yields will not meet projected food demands for the expected 9.6 billion world population, it said.

Increased deforestation, fertiliser use and livestock methane emissions are likely to cause greenhouse gas emissions from food production to rise by almost 80%, experts from the University of Cambridge and University of Aberdeen found.

Lead researcher Bojana Bajzelj, from the University of Cambridge’s department of engineering, said: “Agricultural practices are not necessarily at fault here – but our choice of food is.

“It is imperative to find ways to achieve global food security without expanding crop or pastureland.

“Food production is a main driver of biodiversity loss and a large contributor to climate change and pollution, so our food choices matter.”

He added: “Cutting food waste and moderating meat consumption in more balanced diets, are the essential ‘no-regrets’ options.”

According to the study in Nature Climate Change, current trends in food production will mean that by 2050 cropland will have expanded by 42% and fertiliser use increased by 45% over 2009 levels.

A further tenth of the world’s pristine tropical forests would disappear over the next 35 years, it said.

The study’s authors tested a scenario where all countries were assumed to have an “average” balanced diet – without excessive consumption of sugars, fats, and meat products.

The average balanced diet used in the study was a “relatively achievable goal”, the researchers said, which included two 85g portions of red meat and five eggs per week, as well as a portion of poultry a day.

“This significantly reduced the pressures on the environment even further,” they said.

Co-author Professor Pete Smith, from the University of Aberdeen, said: “Unless we make some serious changes in food consumption trends, we would have to completely de-carbonise the energy and industry sectors to stay within emissions budgets that avoid dangerous climate change.

“That is practically impossible – so, as well as encouraging sustainable agriculture, we need to re-think what we eat.”

Cambridge co-author Prof Keith Richards said: “This is not a radical vegetarian argument; it is an argument about eating meat in sensible amounts as part of healthy, balanced diets.

“Managing the demand better, for example by focusing on health education, would bring double benefits – maintaining healthy populations, and greatly reducing critical pressures on the environment.”