Archive for April, 2012

Chef Superhands

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on April 16, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Chef Superhands
Deep Fried Chicken using his hands

$1 The Value of a Dollar

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 16, 2012 by ecofrenfood

When Jonathan Blaustein purchased 10 early-season organic blueberries for $1, he was a little upset by this price, because six weeks earlier he had purchased 17 organic blueberries from Chile for the same amount of money. And those blueberries from Chile were from 800 miles away but were half the cost of California berries.

Eventually, after seeing many different menus around the world with various dollar-priced meals, photographer Mr. Blaustein, 36, decided to pursue a project “The Value of a Dollar”.

So, what food can you buy if you only have $1 in your wallet? See these photos taken by Mr. Blaustein and find out the answer.


Shurfine flour


A double cheeseburger from McDonald’s


Organic grapefruit from a natural food store


Conventional grapefruit


Tomatillos from Mexico


Candy necklaces from China


Shufrine white bread


Potted meat food product


Organic basmati rice


Tea biscuits from Spain


Shrimp-flavored ramen noodles


Beef shank


Pork floss, or rousong


Fenugreek seeds from India


Saffron


Side salad with ranch dressing from Burger King


Escargot in a can from Indonesia


Early-season organic blueberries from California


Dried smelt

Steamed Clams in Garlic Beer Sauce

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Steamed Clams in Garlic Beer Sauce
From Chef Martin Yan

Garlic, shallots, green chile, black bean sauce and Tsingtao Pure Draft create a rich flavorful sauce in this recipe for steamed clams from chef Martin Yan.
Ingredients:

* 2 tablespoons butter
* 2 teaspoons minced garlic
* 1 shallot, minced
* 1 green chile, thinly sliced
* 1 cup Tsingtao Pure Draft beer
* 3 tablespoons black bean sauce
* 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
* 1 teaspoon sugar
* 2 pounds clams, scrubbed
* 1 teaspoon minced cilantro

Preparation:
Instructions:

1. Heat a stir-fry pan or deep skillet over medium-high heat. Add the butter, swirling until melted. Add the garlic, shallot, and chile and cook until fragrant, about 10 seconds. Add the beer, black bean sauce, vinegar, and sugar and boil until liquid is reduced by half about 5 minutes. Add the clams, cover and let cook until clam shells open, 5-7 minutes.

2. Transfer to a serving dish (discard any clams whose shells have not opened) and garnish with the cilantro.

Steamed Clams With Garlic Beer Sauce recipe created by Chef Martin Yan.
http://chinesefood.about.com/od/seafoodrecipes/r/steamed-clams.htm

Sago palm, Cycas revoluta

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on April 3, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Sago palm, Cycas revoluta

Common name: Sago palm, Sago cycad, king sago palm, just sago palm

Scientific name: Cycas revoluta

Family: Cycadaceae

Genus: Cycas

Species: Revoluta

Plant type:: Tropicals and Tender Perennials,Houseplants

Height: 10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Description: Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta) is the most popular in horticulture, It is one of the most widely cultivated cycads, native to Japan. The leaves are shiny, dark green and about 4-5 ft (1.2-1.5 m) long. Leaves are pinnate and are composed of a rigid midrib with glossy leaflets arranged in a plane along its length. In nature, the trunks will reach around 10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m) in height.

What Are the Health Benefits of Sago?

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2012 by ecofrenfood

What Are the Health Benefits of Sago?

Jun 14, 2011 | By Allison Adams

Sago is a starch taken from the center of sago palm stems. Sago has similarities to tapioca, including its look, taste and feel. However, sago is not tapioca, which comes from a different plant. You can, however, substitute tapioca for sago in many recipes.
The Roles of Sago

Sago is a common ingredient used in Indian recipes. In gruel form, sago can function as a healthy alternative to carbonated drinks, providing energy without any artificial chemicals and sweeteners. Sago is used to make the pearls that sit at the bottom of bubble tea, a popular Asian drink. You can also use sago in the preparation of desserts and some breads. Additionally, you can add sago to rice for a low calorie, light meal option.

Sago and the Body

In India, sago is also known as sabudana and has a long history in traditional Indian medicine. According to “The New Oxford Book of Food Plants,” traditional Indian medicine uses sago in combination with rice to cool the body. Therefore, sago can function as an herbal remedy to treat ailments resulting from too much heat, such as the production of excess bile. Sago is also used in traditional medicine outside the Indian subcontinent in Sri Lanka, New Guinea and other Asian Pacific countries.
Health Facts

Sago does not offer any significant quantity of vitamins or minerals. As a starch, the health benefits of sago come primarily from carbohydrates. This carbohydrate content allows sago to function as a staple food in several regions of the world. Sago is also low in fat and has no protein. Since, the nutritional content of sago is quite low, people often mix sago with other ingredients that offer essential vitamins and nutrients, such as milk or fruits and vegetables.
Preparation of Sago

Recipes usually call for you to soak sago in water for long periods of time. After soaking the sago, you will find the starch less sticky and easier to handle than tapioca. You can also use the powder form of sago as a thickening agent for foods such as gravy or sauces. Additionally, you can use the powder form of sago as a flour substitute. In fact, recipes for many types of Indian and Nepali flat breads specifically call for powdered sago.

References

* “Complete Guide to Edible Wild Plants”; Department of the Army; 2009
* “The Microscopy of the More Commonly Occurring Starches”; Hugh Galt; 2009
* “The New Oxford Book of Food Plants”; John Vaughan; 2009

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/470302-what-are-the-health-benefits-of-sago/#ixzz1qwUhhWuo

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/470302-what-are-the-health-benefits-of-sago/#ixzz1qwUa2Bwc

Almond, Pine Nut, Apricot Crumb Cake

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2012 by ecofrenfood

Almond, Pine Nut, Apricot Crumb Cake

Recipe courtesy Giada De Laurentiis

Ingredients

* 1/2 cup whole almonds, toasted, plus 1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
* 1/4 cup pine nuts, toasted, plus 1/4 cup
* 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
* 1 teaspoon baking powder
* 1/2 teaspoon salt
* 4 large eggs
* 1 1/4 cups sugar
* 1 1/2 sticks butter, melted
* 1/3 cup milk
* 1/4 teaspoon almond extract
* 1/2 cup chopped dried apricots

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Butter and flour a 9-inch cake pan.

Combine the whole almonds and 1/4 cup pine nuts in a food processor. Pulse the machine until the nuts are finely ground. Transfer the nuts to a medium bowl. Add the flour, baking powder, and salt. Stir to combine and set aside.

In a medium bowl, using an electric mixer beat the eggs and the sugar until the mixture becomes thick and pale yellow. Add the butter, and milk. Stir in the almond extract and apricots. Gently stir in the dry ingredients. Pour the batter into the prepared cake pan. Sprinkle the top of the cake with sliced almonds and remaining 1/4 cup pine nuts. Bake until the cake is cooked and a toothpick comes out clean, about 50 to 55 minutes. Let the cake cool on a wire rack. Use a knife to loosen the edges. Turn the cake out, slice, and serve.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/everyday-italian/almond-pine-nut-apricot-crumb-cake-recipe/index.html