Archive for April, 2011

Perfect Guacamole

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on April 14, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Perfect Guacamole

Perfect Guacamole Recipe
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Prep time: 10 minutesIngredients
2 ripe avocados
1/2 red onion, minced (about 1/2 cup)
1-2 serrano chiles, stems and seeds removed, minced
2 tablespoons cilantro leaves, finely chopped
1 tablespoon of fresh lime or lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
A dash of freshly grated black pepper
1/2 ripe tomato, seeds and pulp removed, chopped
Garnish with red radishes or jicama. Serve with tortilla chips.

Method
1 Cut avocados in half. Remove seed. Scoop out avacado from the peel, put in a mixing bowl. (See How to Cut and Peel an Avocado.)

2 Using a fork, mash the avocado. Add the chopped onion, cilantro, lime or lemon, salt and pepper and mash some more. Chili peppers vary individually in their hotness. So, start with a half of one chili pepper and add to the guacamole to your desired degree of hotness. Be careful handling the peppers; wash your hands thoroughly after handling and do not touch your eyes or the area near your eyes with your hands for several hours.

Keep the tomatoes separate until ready to serve.

Remember that much of this is done to taste because of the variability in the fresh ingredients. Start with this recipe and adjust to your taste.

3 Cover with plastic wrap directly on the surface of the guacamole to prevent oxidation from the air reaching it. Refrigerate until ready.

4 Just before serving, add the chopped tomato to the guacamole and mix.

Variations

For a very quick guacamole just take a 1/4 cup of salsa and mix it in with your mashed avocados.

You don’t need to have tomatoes in your guacamole.

To extend a limited supply of avocados, add either sour cream or cottage cheese to your guacamole dip. Purists may be horrified, but so what? It tastes great. In fact, guacamole with a little cottage cheese added to it is my favorite.

Yield: Serves 2-4.

http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/perfect_guacamole/

Chervil

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 14, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium) is a delicate annual herb related to parsley. Sometimes called garden chervil, it is used to season mild-flavoured dishes and is a constituent of the French herb mixture fines herbes.

Sometimes referred to as “gourmet’s parsley”, chervil is used to season poultry, seafood, and young vegetables. It is particularly popular in France, where it is added to omelettes, salads and soups. More delicate than parsley, it has a faint taste of liquorice.

Simmering

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on April 14, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Simmering

Simmering, or stewing, is a modification of boiling. By this method, food is cooked in liquid at a temperature below the boiling point, or anywhere from 185 to 200 degrees Fahrenheit (85-95 Celsius). Water at the simmering point always moves gently–never rapidly as it does in boiling.
Less heat and consequently less fuel are required to cook foods in this way, unless, of course, the time consumed in cooking the food at a low temperature is much greater than that consumed in cooking it more rapidly.

Aside from permitting economy in the use of fuel, simmering, or stewing, cooks deliciously certain foods that could not be selected for the more rapid methods. For example, tough cuts of meat and old fowl can be made tender and tasty by long cooking at a low temperature, for this method tends to soften the fiber and to develop an excellent flavor.

Tough vegetables, too, can be cooked tender by the simmering process without using so much fuel as would be used if they were boiled, for whatever method is used they require long cooking. Beets, turnips, and other winter vegetables should be stewed rather than boiled, as it is somewhat difficult to cook them tender, especially in the late winter and early spring.

If dry beans and peas are brought to the simmering point and then allowed to cook, they can be prepared for the table in practically the same length of time and without so much fuel as if they boiled continuously.

http://www.alanskitchen.com/Terms/Wet/Simmer.htm

Tasty but deadly

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2011 by ecofrenfood



Many types of imported fried fruits countries have been found to contain high levels of lead

Tasty but deadly
http://dailychilli.com/news/­267-tasty-but-deadly

1 of 2 9/10/2009 12:50 PM

Lead also poses risks to pregnant women and infants.

Malaysia’s move to bar the 18 brands of dried fruits comes in the wake of last

Friday’s move by the United States’ Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA)

advisory against eating dried fruits imported from Asia.

Testing results in Texas found that dried plums and products containing dried

plums contained lead as much as 300 times the acceptable level.

The FDA doe not have lead limits specifically for prunes, but the Centre for

Disease Control and Prevention has advised avoiding consumption of any

amount of lead.

The warning, however, did not apply to prunes from the US .

Plaintiff Foods Hair Loss

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 3, 2011 by ecofrenfood

Plaintiff Foods Hair Loss

Thinning hair is a horrible thing for women. Not only have external treatment, food intake is also important guarded. If you start to see hair loss, hair piled on the floor, pillow, or a water hole in the bathroom, you should start trying mengasup foods that strengthen and protect your scalp. Here are a few:

Fish, eggs, and nuts
The main content of hair is protein. Therefore, try eating protein will be helpful for healthy hair. However, that does not mean you can eat high protein foods as they please regardless of other content. Steak, for example, is rich in protein, but also high in fat. High fat will increase testosterone levels. This is believed to cause hair loss. So, the steak is food that should be avoided for no more hair loss. Pick enough protein foods, like fish-ikanan (which also has other content that are good for the body), chicken, veal liver, low-fat cheese, eggs, almonds, seeds, and yogurt. Soy milk and tofu is also a good food additive because it is rich in protein and low in bad fats.

Raisins
Iron plays an important role in producing hemoglobin, the part of blood that carries oxygen to all organs and tissues. When hemoglobin is in a healthy level, oxygen is distributed properly. This means you get your scalp healthy blood flow and will stimulate and build healthy hair. Adding iron in the diet does not mean you should eat liver every day. You can add sweet foods, such as raisins and cherry juice, rich in iron.

Eggs, dates, raisins, dark green leafy vegetables, whole grains and cereals are also rich in iron. Vitamin C helps iron absorption, which can be obtained from oranges, strawberries, and lemon.

Bean sprouts
Our bodies use a substance called silica (not silica gel for absorbing moisture in the bag) to absorb vitamins and minerals. If the body lacks silica, vitamin every day that you enter will not be useful. Silica can be obtained from the bean sprouts, cucumber skin, red and green peppers, and potatoes.

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